Sunday, March 29, 2015

I'm All Wrapped Up, All Tied Up, All Tangled Up in Jesus


Wrapped Up, Tied Up, Tangled Up

I’m all wrapped up,
I’m all tied up,
I’m all tangled up in Jesus.
I’m all wrapped up,
I’m all tied up,
I’m all tangled up in God.

I’m all wrapped up,
All tied up,
All tangled up in Jesus.
I’m all wrapped up,
tied up, tangled up in God.


Repeat, faster each time



Saturday, March 28, 2015

My latest crafty projects

It's the weekend, so you know I've been working on my latest projects. I'll have more photos tomorrow. Also check out The Crafty Dad and Daughter site!

I also bought a plum tree and got my the oil changed in my car today, but that's about the most excitement I've had.







Friday, March 27, 2015

Brooks offers authentic, down-to-earth wisdom from one dad to another

 Part 1 of an interview with Tez Brooks,
Author of The Single Dad Detour: Directions for Fathering After Divorce

In The Single Dad Detour: Directions for Fathering After Divorce (Kregel/February 27, 2015/ISBN: 978-0825443602/$14.99), Tez Brooks offers authentic, down-to-earth wisdom from one dad to another. This much-needed guidebook addresses the spiritual and emotional health of fathers as well as their financial and practical arrangements. Using the experience of his own divorce and the real-life stories of other single dads, The Single Dad Detour is a humorous and invaluable companion for single dads at all stages of their journey.

Q: The Single Dad Detour shares insights and encouragement from your time as a single dad. You’ve said it was difficult to write it because of the memories that surfaced. What led you to write it anyway?

I really struggled for several years. I didn’t want to go there, but the Lord started working in my heart, and I remembered how there just wasn’t anything out there for me when I was going through my own divorce, especially with a Christian worldview. What was available was too preachy for me. So I wrote something that would encourage guys with a little humor and offer some practical advice.

Q: Would you be willing to share a little bit about your road to becoming a single dad?

We entered our marriage with childhood abuse that had not been dealt with, which led to a lot of selfishness, unfaithfulness and even some mental health issues that had not been diagnosed. We were clueless and trying to navigate through that with little to no help.

Divorce was just not something my side of the family did, but you can’t make someone love you, and you can’t make someone stay. So although I didn’t want a failed marriage, I saw it coming. I was married almost 10 years when I found myself single again. It was a lonely, depressing time for me, but I ran to the Lord to survive.

The kids lived with me full-time about three out of the seven years I was single. They experienced a lot of loss too. As you know, no one wins when it comes to divorce. It’s a lose-lose situation. Yet here we are on the other side by the grace of God.

Click here to enter!
Q: Some believe the court system can be unfair to men in divorce and custody decisions. What advice do you have for those men on fighting resentment and bitterness?

While many states have become more progressive and friendly toward the father having custody, there are still many judicial systems that are old-fashioned. When that happens we can fight for our rights as fathers and still have a Christ-like manner about us, especially when dealing with our ex-spouse. Jesus was angry when he knocked over the merchants’ tables in the temple . . . yet he was without sin. Too often we forget to model Christ in the midst of defending our rights. Our anger toward the courts can get misdirected to others.

We often need to lay down our rights; Christ did this too. That being said, when bitterness and resentment rise up — and it will — we must fight that with prayer and forgiveness. That is easier said than done, though, which is why it’s so important we throw ourselves at the foot of the cross every day.

Q: Many men build their lives on the idea that a wife, kids and house equal success. When that crumbles, where can they find their identity?

That’s a great question because our identity needs to be grounded in Christ to begin with. If that’s not the case when tragedy strikes, we’re in trouble. That’s exactly where I found myself. I was a Christian, but I didn’t really understand my identity as a child of God. I thought my self-worth was found in the typical American dream. When that disappeared in my 30s, I suddenly felt like I had no real value to anyone.

I had embraced the world’s view of who and what I was. In essence, I had allowed the world to place a price tag on my forehead, based on my achievements. Suddenly, I was marked down 95% and thrown into the bargain bin. It can take a long time for the message of Christ to move from our heads to our hearts. That’s what needed to happen with me. Thankfully the Holy Spirit began a work that revealed to me the value God had placed on me. It was vital to my healing.

Q: Divorce often leaves a man feeling broken and depressed, yet pressured to put on a brave front. How can a dad authentically lead his children during such a dark time?

Authenticity is important, especially when you’re trying to lead your kids through some tough transitions. There’s a certain amount of safety and refuge a child experiences from seeing his or her dad strongly brave the storms. Conversely when they see a parent falling apart and becoming an emotional basket case, it does nothing to nurture a sense of security.

Still, our children need to know we are human. I need to model for my kids that I’m nothing apart from God, and I’m not capable of doing anything without Christ. The problem with the stoic “front” is it’s not real. It’s inauthentic — a mask to hide behind. True faith in God, which comes from your heart and the very core of your beliefs, is what produces peace. That peace from God is what gives men the strength to move forward without falling apart and crying like a baby. Trusting God is also going to help us in our role as dads. Kids need to see the courage and calm that come from a heart that believes God has got this. 

Q: You have now been remarried for thirteen years and have two young children. How did navigating the difficult years of single parenting prepare you for the challenge of a blended family?

As a man, I found I grew in several ways. First of all, I was stripped bare of all my pride, arrogance, selfishness and more. The Lord spent those seven years of singleness re-building me into more of what he wanted me to be. My wife, Christine, has always said she would not have been attracted to the kind of man I was before. I can’t say I blame her. Thankfully, God’s timing is perfect.

That time as a single dad also made me a better father. I consistently see how my single years changed me spiritually, emotionally and relationally so I could be a better dad both for my older kids and the two daughters Christine and I had together. It’s difficult to see that, though, when you’re in the midst of your valley. Hindsight provides a lot of perspective.

Q: What is the number-one thing you want single dads to get from reading The Single Dad Detour?

I’d like them to walk away encouraged to keep going strong. I want them to know the Lord is on their side. I want to challenge them to step up, yet still offer them the grace they’ll need to be able to laugh at themselves when they aren’t perfect. There’s too much pressure as it is! If dads can celebrate what they’re doing right while still leaning desperately on the Savior for hope, it will make the road they’re navigating much easier.


Learn more about Tez Brooks and The Single Dad Detour at www.everysingledad.com, on Facebook (everysingledad) or on Twitter (tezd63).

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Does Christianity have a place in today’s world?


Professor and seasoned debater brings important
discussion about God and the public square

The concepts of tolerance and political correctness are having a chilling effect on the public practice of Christianity. That’s why readers will find Dr. John C. Lennox’s new book Against the Flow: The Inspiration of Daniel in an Age of Relativism (Monarch Books/March 27, 2015/ISBN: 978-0857216212/$19.99) incredibly timely. Lennox, who has defended the Christian faith in debates against the likes of Richard Dawkins and Christopher Hitchens, gives every follower of Christ the intellectual foundation they will need to argue the role their faith should have in the public discourse. 

While anyone who has spent time in a Sunday-school classroom is familiar with the biblical story of Daniel, Lennox mines this classic historical account to encourage cultural bravery in Christians trying to find their place in a postmodern society. The story of these four young men born in the tiny state of Judah around 500 B.C. and captured by Nebuchadnezzar, the emperor of Babylon, is one of extraordinary faith in God lived out at the pinnacle of executive power. The book of Daniel describes in detail how each of them eventually rose to senior positions of administration.

Yet despite their lucrative positions, Daniel and his friends were not content simply to maintain their private devotion to God. Instead they maintained a high-profile witness in a pluralistic society that was highly antagonistic to their faith, and they would eventually be forced to face the possibility of paying the ultimate price for their religious bravery. Lennox proposes their story carries a powerful message for us today as Christians living in a society that tolerates the practice of Christianity in private homes and in church services, but increasingly deprecates and in some cases even punishes public witness.

“Strong currents of pluralism and secularism in contemporary Western society, reinforced by a paralyzing political correctness, increasingly push expression of faith in God to the margins, confining it if possible to the private sphere,” Lennox says. “It is becoming less and less the ‘done thing’ to mention God in public, let alone to confess to believing in anything exclusive and absolute, such as the uniqueness of Jesus Christ as Son of God and Savior.” Lennox believes if Daniel and his compatriots were with us today they would be in the vanguard of public debate.

Against the Flow is a truly fascinating examination of the life of Daniel from a leading expert on faith and science. In his first biblical work, Dr. Lennox provides a unique perspective on both Western society and biblical exegesis that will make Against the Flow an instant classic encouraging Christians to speak out in our modern Babylon.

Learn more about John C. Lennox and Against the Flow at www.johnlennox.org or on Twitter


About the Author

Dr. John C. Lennox is Professor of Mathematics at the University of Oxford and Fellow in Mathematics and Philosophy of Science at Green Templeton College. He studied at the Royal School Armagh, Northern Ireland, and was Exhibitioner and Senior Scholar at Emmanuel College, Cambridge University from which he took his MA, MMath and PhD. He also holds an MA and DPhil from Oxford University and an MA in Bioethics from the University of Surrey.

Lennox lectures on faith and science for the Oxford Centre for Christian Apologetics and has traveled throughout North America, Eastern and Western Europe and Australasia lecturing on mathematics, the philosophy of science and the intellectual defense of Christianity. He has debated Richard Dawkins at the University of Alabama (2007) and the Oxford Museum of Natural History (2008), as well as Christopher Hitchens at the Edinburgh Festival (2008) and at Samford University (2010), among others.

Lennox’s hobbies include amateur astronomy, bird-watching and walking. He and his wife, Sally, have three grown children and seven grandchildren. They make their home near Oxford.


Keep up with John C. Lennox and read more about Against the Flow at www.johnlennox.org or on Twitter (ProfJohnLennox).

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Animals smell really bad and I may be allergic to all of them

Last night after being around all the dirt and livestock at the Youth Expo, I woke up with stopped up ears and drainage gunk. Just ugh.

However, I was kind of pumped to stend a few hours away from the office to see how the girls fared at the rabbit show.

There were lots more rabbits this year and the judge was crazy meticulous. As I sat around watching the judge count rabbit toes and check all their parts, my face was itching like crazy... The same way I get around a friend's cats and dogs. We had pet rabbits when I was a kid, but I don't think I was allergic to them.

After close to four hours, the girls' rabbits were eliminated. No telling how long it took to finish out the judging, and then do showmanship. I was away from the office 5 hours and worked until close to 9 tonight because I needed to get work done and my hours in.

I barely touched a rabbit yet was trying not to smell the stank of youth expo that clings tightly to anyone that steps foot out there all afternoon long.

At least we're done with all that until next year.

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Run piggy run!

It's a busy week to be a spectator.

Last night Paige won both the 1600 and 2400m at her track meet by a lot.


Tonight Peyton showed her pig. Paige was supposed to show too, but one of their pigs lost weight and didn't make the weight limit. It wasn't as exciting as last year's show where Peyton got second in her class and Paige won Grand Champion, but Peyton did well.


Both did way better than I did with my picture taking from afar.

Monday, March 23, 2015

Colleen Coble talks about the Journey of the Heart serials

An interview with Colleen Coble
Author of the Journey of the Heart series


 
Colleen Coble’s Journey of the Heart series take readers back to her very first book. Revised to read as a single epic novel, the Journey of the Heart serialization launched in March (2015) with A Heart’s Disguise, and an installment will follow each month through August. In the following interview, Coble shares why this story remains so close to her heart.

Q: What made you want to be a novelist? What really kick-started your career?

I wrote my first story in first grade about a horse that had twin colts. The teacher praised it, and the dream of being a writer was planted. It went underground for a while when I started raising our family, but when my younger brother, Randy, was killed in a freak lightning storm, the dream resurrected.

Q: What inspired the story in Journey of the Heart?

My first book was really a grieving book for Randy. I wanted to write a story about him if he’d lived in the 1800s as he’d always wished. When I wrote the story, it really helped me to come to grips with my grief.

Q: What was it like to write a story that came from such a personal place for you?

It reminded me in many ways that my brother isn’t really dead. He’s more alive now in heaven than he’s ever been. And I will see him again. There are always pieces of the author in every story, and these books are a prime example of that! In the first book, Rand comes back from the dead, basically. His family thought he died in the Civil War. Even now, when I reread the part where his family realizes he’s alive, I cry.

Q: How is the new release of the series different from the original?

These books have the amazing touch of my team at HarperCollins Christian Publishing on them. With their suggestions, I’ve enhanced conflict and characterization and even changed some endings.

Q: What message do you hope readers walk away with after reading the Journey of the Heart series?

We will all have trials in our lives. Trials serve to make us stronger and to point us to the One who is always by our side, no matter what we face!


To keep up with Colleen Coble, visit www.colleencoble.com, become a fan on Facebook (colleencoblebooks) or follow her on Twitter (@colleencoble). 


Sunday, March 22, 2015

The B-I-B-L-E


B-I-B-L-E

The B-I-B-L-E
Yes, that’s the book for me
I stand alone on the Word of God

The B-I-B-L-E




Saturday, March 21, 2015

That was a bust

Well, all the hard work I've put in the last three weeks to have stock ready for a booth today was a complete waste.

There were supposed to be 30+ vendors at the Mabank Pavilion for a Relay for Life race this morning. I was up at 5:15 this morning. That's 5:15 AM on a Saturday when I normally have a 9:00 Saturday rule.

This after seeing 2:00 AM a time or two this week.

I sold three items. Three. Like 1-2-3.

A crocheted headband that I made probably back in October.

A plaque that was one of the first I did.

A jewelry holder.

I spent what money I made after paying for a booth on paint pens at Walmart on the way back home. (Though the positive is I found colors I had not been able to get here in town.)

Once I got home, I had to put up this mess, and try to reclaim my house for a home not disaster area. (I guess it's the dining room, but it's mainly the room that connects all other rooms. You go through it to the kitchen, to get to the stairs, get to the hall to the bedrooms...)



Now that it's warmed up, I'm going to move plants back out of sunroom and have it set up to be more of a studio since my drawing table is out there. It's been too cold to be out there lately.

So, lesson learned... stop staying up all hours of the night. And here's to hoping we do better at the next two events I have scheduled.

Friday, March 20, 2015

Someone needs to go to bed earlier

I've been staying up way too late trying to finish off some projects for a booth we're doing this weekend. I really, really, really hope some of this sells!

Of course, you can mosey on over to The Crafty Dad and Daughter and order something you see!