Sunday, November 11, 2018

Creation Song


Creation Song

Day one, day one
God made light when there was none,
Day one, day one
God made light when there was none.

Day two, day two
God made clouds and skies of blue
Day two, day two
God made clouds and skies of blue

Day three, day three
God made grass and flowers and trees
Day three, day three
God made grass and flowers and trees

Day four, day four
God made sun, moon and stars galore
Day four, day four
God made sun, moon and stars galore

Day five, day five
God made birds and fish alive
Day five, day five
God made birds and fish alive

Sixth day, sixth day
God made animals and man that day,
Sixth day, sixth day
God made animals and man that day.

Day seven, day seven
God rested in His heaven
Day seven, day seven
God rested in His heaven

Thursday, November 8, 2018

Mentorship is building relationships

Part 2 of an interview with Rhonda Stoppe,
Author of The Marriage Mentor

To attain any goal, it is helpful to have a support system to offer encouragement in the tough times, wisdom based on personal experience, and an example to aspire to. Having a mentor can make all the difference in the world. The same is true when it comes to marriage. Every couple needs a more experienced couple to come alongside them, dedicated to helping build the marriage they’ve always dreamed of. In The Marriage Mentor: Becoming the Couple You Long to Be (Harvest House Publishers), Steve and Rhonda Stoppe are that couple.

After three decades of doing life together, raising four children, and helping other couples build no-regrets marriages, the Stoppes have compiled their success secrets into an easy-to-read, fun, and interactive book. Every page feels like a candid conversation with a friend. Readers will laugh and learn from a biblical perspective the secrets to enjoying a marriage that lasts a lifetime.


Recognizing most books are bought by women, and most men don’t love to read, The Marriage Mentor is broken down into small sections with separate sections for the husband and wife to read. Each chapter includes:

·         Man to Man: A short section printed in gray so men can’t miss it, written by Steve talking specifically to husbands.
·         From a Husband’s Perspective: A segment written from Steve to wives to offer insight to the male point of view.
·         From a Wife’s Perspective: Rhonda jumps in to give husband’s an explanation of how a woman thinks.
·         Thinking it Through and Living it Out: Discussion questions that will prompt healthy conversations.
·         Marriage Mentor Videos: Fun and lighthearted online videos of Steve and Rhonda discussing each chapter

Q: Why is it important for young married couples to have older couples in their lives as mentors?

As a young bride, I knew I was not the wife I had hoped I would be. I would buy books about being a better wife, but I soon learned the books did not have the power to change me. My husband and I were in youth ministry, so I looked to the marriages of the parents of the teens for help. The Bible calls the older women to teach the younger how to love their husbands and their children, so I asked women with marriages I wanted to emulate to be my Titus 2 mentors. What I learned from these women transformed my marriage and my parenting.


In answer to God’s mandate to be a Titus 2 mentor, I now write and speak to help women build “no-regrets lives.” Imagine if you had your own personal marriage mentor. In The Marriage Mentor, I pass on the biblical principles toward a happy marriage I learned from these Titus 2 women.
               
Make friends with couples who have their hearts set on eternity and learn from their example. In one of the chapters, readers will find a list of eight insights to a happy marriage that I learned from these godly mentors.

Q: What does it mean to mentor? How do you and Steve mentor young married couples?

Mentoring is not a program. Rather, mentorship is building relationships with people, so you can do life together. The way Jesus taught the disciples while they walked, camped and fished together is the perfect example.

With transparency, share with those you mentor what you’ve learned from your own successes and failures. When people believe you empathize with their struggles you earn the right to speak truth into their lives.

With every wedding ceremony that Steve agrees to perform, we spend 6 weeks in premarital counseling with the couple. We don’t think anyone should get married without having this type of focused interaction with a seasoned couple. Not only do the sessions open conversations to teach them how to manage carefully conflicts down the road, it also builds a relationship between us and the couple. So, after they are wed, they’re more likely to reach out to us when they have questions or struggles. Again, it’s not a program, but rather relationship building that knits our hearts together.


Q: Should every Christian couple either have a marriage mentor or be a mentor?

In a perfect world? Yes! How great would it be if every older couple was spiritually mature enough to pour into a younger couple what they’ve learned about building a no regrets marriage? But the truth is, too many couples in the church today put on a pretense of having a good marriage, when in reality, they’re hanging on by a thread or simply co-existing.

Often couples who need mentors will refuse help because they are concerned about their reputation. So, inviting them to join your small group or Bible Study is a great place to start. For me, the women I looked to as mentors invited me to their weekly study of Philippians. I was like, “Hey ladies, I don’t need another Bible Study, I need help to be a better wife!”

The ladies smiled knowingly, while encouraging me to attend their class. And do you know what I found? A wealth of insight poured out of these women as they told what they were learning from their study. They openly shared their past regrets, and transparently told how God’s grace had transformed their hearts, lives and marriages.

These women’s stories and insights filled me with so much hope! I thought, “If God can change them, He can change me too!”

You see, that’s how mentoring works. When we take the time to be real and share how Christ in us is our only hope, God uses it to draw others to learn from what we share.


Q: Should a young couple seek out an older couple or is it ok, for example, for the young wife to seek out a mentor on her own?

Any couple who wants to gain wisdom for building a better marriage should seek out an older couple as a mentor. For some, this could be their parents who have displayed a godly example. For many that may be too close to home causing weird in-law dynamics. So, looking for godly couples whom you’d like to emulate is a great place to start.

And just be really honest with them. Say something like, “Hey, we love the way you love each other, and we want to learn your secrets to a happy marriage. Can we just hang out with you and glean from your wisdom?”

For me, as a young wife, I didn’t wait for Steve to ask couples to mentor us. I knew I needed help becoming the wife I longed to be, and I knew the women I had been observing held the secrets I needed to know. As I spent time in Bible study with these ladies, our study time often lingered into long conversations after the class. And as my friendship with these women grew, Steve and I naturally gravitated toward fellowshipping with them. We watched them interact with each other and with their children. We listened and learned as we did life alongside of these faithful servants of Christ.

Q: Do you have to be intentional in starting a mentoring relationship or is it something that can be more be more organic and simply grown into a mentorship?

For me, I was intentional in seeking out marriage mentors—because I kind of scared myself one day as a young bride when I flipped out on Steve for leaving peanut butter toast crumbs on the kitchen counter. (You can hear the whole story in this Family Life Today interview.)

The kind of wife I meant to be was so far from the kind of wife I was becoming. I didn’t grow up with great examples, so I had no idea how to change. But seeing women in our church who loved well their husbands and families gave me hope, and the courage to ask them to help me learn and grow. I felt a little vulnerable as I approached them for help, but I was desperate.

Q: How much older does the couple need to be? Should they be 20, 30, 40 years older or do they just need to be a phase or two ahead?

I don’t think I can assign a specific age to finding a mentor. Sometimes they’ll be the same age, or even younger than you. I think it’s more about spiritual maturity. When the Apostle Paul trained Timothy for ministry he said, “let no one despise your youth.”

Wherever you find yourself in life, you can know that God wants you to equip yourself to mentor someone who is a few steps on the path behind you. If we think we have to wait until we’ve got it all together, we will never feel ready to mentor. Philippians 2:13 says, “It is God who works in you both to will and to do for His good pleasure.” If you make it your life’s goal to pursue loving Christ with all of your heart, you can be confident that His love for others will spill out of you, and He will entrust you with people He wants to mentor through you.

Q: When a couple mentors a couple, can the older man offer advice to the younger woman (and can the older woman to the younger man) or should conversations be directed to be man-to-man and woman-to-woman?

That’s a very good question. It is important to ask God to give you wisdom as you interact with a couple you are mentoring. The Bible says we should not give Satan even a foothold to cause us to stumble. When offering advice to a person of the opposite sex, you must be cautious. As a rule, we meet with the couple and chat together. In the final chapter of The Marriage Mentor you can get the feel of what it would be like to interact with Steve and I as a couple, as he and I banter back and forth throughout the chapter.

In 37 years of marriage, Steve and I have made it a policy not to mentor alone a person of the opposite sex. I remember when my kids were younger, and Steve was a pastor. If a woman walked into Steve’s office to talk and I wasn’t there, our child would sit outside Steve’s opened door until I arrived. Often one of our kids would send the other to bring me back while they awaited my arrival. I chuckle now as I remember the scenario. But our kids understood our commitment to be above reproach in how we interacted with the opposite sex—and they were always ready to help us out in a pinch! (You may think this is overkill, but in the many years Steve and I have mentored ministry couples we’ve observed how carelessness in this area can jeopardize marriages and ministries.)


Learn more about The Marriage Mentor at Rhonda Stoppe’s website www.NoRegretsWoman.com. She is also active on YouTube (Rhonda Stoppe No Regrets Woman), Facebook (RhondaStoppeNoRegretsWoman) and on Twitter (@RhondaStoppe).



Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Sign-up to review Real Change

Real Change: Becoming More Like Jesus in Everyday Life
by Andrew Nicholls and Helen Thorne, edited by David Powlison
NOW AVAILABLE FOR REVIEW!

CLICK HERE TO REQUEST A COPY

or use the sign-up form below.
About the book:
Every honest Christian knows the need for change. But how to get there? How do you move forward from struggles both big and small? And how does our faith in God impact our everyday thoughts, feelings, and actions? This six-session small group resource gives participants an opportunity to reflect on one particular area in their lives and then to learn more about how God changes us to become more like Jesus. All of us struggle to love God and those around us, but God has promised to keep working on us. And God always keeps his promises. The change that his gospel produces will make your life and your relationships truly beautiful. This self-contained resource with Leader’s Notes will encourage small group participants to understand and apply a biblical view of change to their lives and relationships.
Real Change: Becoming More Like Jesus in Everyday Life is based on the CCEF model of change from David Powlison’s course, Dynamics of Biblical Change.  The easy-to-use six lesson format and included leader’s guide, guides participant's toward an honest discussion of there own struggles  while providing an understanding of how a relationship with Christ brings change. Topics addressed include understanding how we typically respond to trouble, how the cross of Christ brings comfort, help, and change, and how we can grow to be like Christ in the hardest circumstances.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Andrew Nicholls, MA, MB, BChir, is a former doctor and pastor who is now Director of Pastoral Care at Oak Hill Theological College, London. He is married to Hilary and they have two children.
Helen Thorne, BSc(Hons), MA is the Director of Training and Mentoring at London City Mission. She is a trustee of Biblical Counselling UK and involved in pastoral care within her local church. She is an experienced speaker and author of Purity is Possible, 5 Things to Pray for your City and Walking with Domestic Abuse Sufferers.
David Powlison, MDiv, PhD, serves as CCEF's executive director, as a faculty member, and as senior editor of the Journal of Biblical Counseling. David has been counseling for over thirty years and has written numerous articles on biblical counseling and on the relationship between faith and psychology. His books include Speaking Truth in Love; Seeing with New Eyes; Power Encounters: Reclaiming Spiritual Warfare; The Biblical Counseling Movement: History and Context; Good and Angry: Redeeming Anger, Irritation, Complaining and Bitterness; Making All Things New: Restoring Joy to the Sexually Broken; and God's Grace in Your Suffering.


Monday, November 5, 2018

God Counts: Numbers in His Word and His World


Counting the Truths of Scripture
Children will learn to look for numbers in the
Bible that point towards God’s love for them.


Children learn in different ways, and children who love numbers and patterns often find it challenging to engage with Bible stories if they aren’t naturally drawn toward reading or hearing stories. Many parents long to help their kids grow in love for God—but capturing their children’s attention requires uniquely and creatively utilizing their gifts, passions, and interests.

For the children who love numbers and patterns—who are constantly seeking, finding, tracing, and counting—God Counts: Numbers in His Word and His World (New Growth Press/November 5, 2018) by Irene Sun is for them. As a mother and homeschool teacher to four boys, Sun is familiar with the different ways in which children learn, grow, and engage. Her own firstborn son loved stories, including The Big Picture Story Bible by David Helm and Read Aloud Bible Stories by Ella K. Lindvall. However, when her second son came along and sat on her lap to read these books, she noticed he was not as interested.

“When I read Bible stories to him, he would yell, ‘The end! The end!’ by the time we turned to page two,” she says. “But he loved numbers. And the Lord is kind to fill his world and his Word with numbers. The idea of God Counts was planted by this number-loving child of mine. He opened my eyes to see truth, goodness, and beauty in unlikely places.”

For many months, Sun was on a number hunt, collecting numbers from both the Old and New Testaments, tracing patterns as they slowly emerged. She describes the process as a time in which “numbers sang,” declaring God’s glory and proclaiming his handiwork. Each number, she notes, “poured out speech and revealed knowledge” about God (Psalm 19:1–2). She would share her findings with her son and watch his face light up as she read God Counts to him.

While Sun wrote the book with her number-loving son in mind, the illustrations and content will engage all preschoolers. Through simple language young children can understand and countable, playful illustrations, God Counts introduces Bible stories and theological truths about the Trinity, the God of order, the holiness of God, the problem of sin, the rescue and love of Jesus, and much more. Young readers learn that in the beginning, God created numbers to tell us about himself, and the author points out how numbers magnify God—like a telescope magnifies the stars.

By deepening a child’s understanding of the larger redemptive story of Scripture, Sun pieces together a model of reverence for our sovereign God: “God counts every fish in the sea, every star in the sky. God counts every hair on your head, every tear you cry. God counts all of your steps until you walk with him side by side. God counts all of your days until you see him face to face.”

Children, like adults, are meaning makers, and Sun knows the importance of engaging children who love numbers through arrangement, color, and pattern. On each page, they see not one picture but a mosaic of images and patterns. No detail is too small, and God Counts celebrates this truth about our Creator.

Sun’s hope for God Counts is that children would use their curiosity to ask important questions. “What do numbers tell us about God? What does God’s Word tell us about numbers?” she asks. “I want them to not only use numbers—to add, subtract, multiply, and divide—but to give thanks for them.”

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Irene Sun, M.A.R., Th.M., is a preachers wife, mother, daughter to missionaries, and sister to three godly women. Irene was born in Malaysia but has lived all over the world. She studied liturgy and literature at Yale University and the Old Testament at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, where the Lord prepared her to be a homeschool teacher to her four boys. The Suns make their home outside of Chicago, IL.

New Growth Press publishes gospel-centered Christian books, small group, and children’s Bible resources for discipleship, biblical counseling, and missional ministry. For more information about God Counts: Numbers in His Word and His World and other releases from New Growth Press, visit www.newgrowthpress.com.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Advance Praise:

“I’ve learned much from the writing of Irene Sun over the years, and I'm delighted that my young son will likewise learn about God from her in this wonderful, creative little book of numbers in the plan of redemption.”

~ Collin Hansen, editorial director of The Gospel Coalition and author of Young, Restless, Reformed: A Journalist’s Journey with the New Calvinists

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


God Counts: Numbers in His Word and His World
Written by Irene Sun / November 5, 2018 / Retail Price: $17.99
Print ISBN: 978-1-945270-79-6
RELIGION/Christian Life/Family

Sunday, November 4, 2018

Hosanna


Hosannna
by Carl Tuttle

Hosanna, Hosanna,
Hosanna in the highest
Hosanna, Hosanna,
Hosanna in the highest

Lord we lift up Your Name,
With hearts full of praise,
Be exalted Oh Lord my God,
Hosanna in the highest.

Glory, Glory,
Glory to the King of Kings
Glory, Glory,
Glory to the King of Kings

Lord we lift up Your Name,
With hearts full of praise,
Be exalted Oh Lord my God,

Hosanna in the highest.



Saturday, November 3, 2018

More Christmas!

Since some of you are decorating now that Halloween is over (a bit early for me, yet I look for Hobby Lobby to roll out Christmas in June or July), here are a few more new Christmas items!









Friday, November 2, 2018

Facing the devastating loss of your most precious dreams


Part 2 of an interview with Lindsey R. Dennis,
Author of Buried Dreams


At 20 weeks pregnant, Lindsey R. Dennis and her husband were told the child she was carrying would not live due to a fatal diagnosis. Later, in another stunning blow, they were told the same news with her second pregnancy. Through the crushing of their hopes and dreams, they came to know the kind of resurrection hope that can rise from the grave. This experience of infant loss revealed how sorrow and suffering are instruments in the hands of God to forge in us a greater joy and hope than one can ever know. This kind of joy can only be discovered when we walk through the deep pain of burying our most precious dreams.

Buried Dreams offers an uplifting perspective, sharing how devastating loss of personal dreams can give way to unimaginable hope and how death can give way to life. Framing her own story of staggering loss and soaring hope with biblical perspective, Dennis highlights that we can never plan for the unexpected turns of this life that sometimes lead to great personal suffering, but we can reach for the One who is there with us in the loss.

Q: How is Buried Dreams different from other stories of loss and grief?

You really see how integral our community was in our journey and how they came along side of us to support us not only in our grief, but also in celebrating the lives of our children. This spirit of celebration and army of people rising up to be His hands and feet is not something I have seen much in books on loss and grief. I’ve cried through most books I’ve read on suffering. While you’ll definitely experience the weight of the sadness of our story, I think you’ll be surprised at the things that make you laugh and smile along the way.

Q: It seems counterintuitive that sorrow and suffering would be pathways to hope. Why do you believe this is true?

Hope is quite literally the expectation of something happening. The hope I speak of in this book is “the confident expectation of the promises of Jesus both that we have received now and that we know are coming.”

I think often when we experience suffering in our culture, we just want to get out of it. We fail to understand and see that our response to suffering reveals what we believe not just about life, but about God. It is only in seasons of suffering we see the questions that have perhaps always been in our hearts begin to surface.

What is hope? Can I really trust God with my life? What does it mean that He is the hope that doesn’t disappoint? I want the reader to not miss what God may have for them in these often-unwelcome seasons, but to really see them as integral. Often in this life, in our broken world, and throughout scripture you see glory and joy spoken of in connection with suffering. In Hebrews 12:2, “For the joy set before Him, He endured the cross.” In 1 Corinthians 4:17-18, “For these light and momentary afflictions are producing for you an eternal weight of glory.” In Romans 5:3-5 “and suffering produces perseverance and perseverance character and character, hope.”

For some reason, this is how God is redeeming our pain, juxtaposing His hope and joy next to suffering. They always go together. We must learn how to live in the tension of both. I think you’ll see my own journey of wrestling with that tension as well as becoming resolved and surrendering to the mystery of the connection between suffering and hope.

Q: How did your local community come along side you and Kevin during your time of grief? How did your community grow to a huge online following of fellow Christians praying for you and your family?

Our church community really rallied around us when we found out each of the girls’ conditions. While I was pregnant with Sophie, one of my friends from church, Jennafer, created a secret “Celebrating Sophie” Facebook group where people would sign up each week to help us celebrate her life. The one thing we really wanted to make sure we did was celebrate each week she was alive and with us. Kevin and I came up with a small list of things, but our community really elevated our celebration meter. They really entered in with us and did the same with Dasah. Though our journey with Dasah was different, our community continued to rally around us in prayer and encouragement. They really lifted our arms to hope and life during our grief by their constant presence, encouragement and willingness to enter the pain with us.

I had just started a blog a few weeks before we found out Sophie’s condition but hadn’t posted anything yet. When we found out, I knew there would be lots of questions and people would want to know how we were doing. Instead of having to field those questions over and over, I wanted there to be a central place to let people in on our lives and our daughter’s life. My first blog post was of her diagnosis. Within 24 hours it had thousands of views, and I was shocked. As the weeks and months went on, I shared how I was doing spiritually and the ways we were celebrating her life each week. It became an outlet for me to grieve, but also a small offering of hope to others. In many ways, I felt like I had nothing to offer people in the midst of my weariness, but I could at least offer how Jesus was meeting me in the darkness. Something about that resonated with readers and people from all over the country and world began to follow our story. I still can’t wrap my mind around how our story touched men and women from so many different walks of life, but I think when we offer God the little we have, we are often surprised by the ways He chooses to multiply the little. That’s simply what He did with my blog. He took my offering of my brokenness and pain and allowed it to be a means to show hundreds of thousands of people how He is a God who meets us in the darkness and is worthy of our lives.

Q: For those who followed your blog through your experiences, what new content will they read in the book?

Buried Dreams is focused not only on my story with our girls, but how I was experiencing God and wrestling with who He was and what He had chosen for our story. I think those who followed my story online will see a greater picture of my own journey of faith and be invited into some of the deeper places of questioning and pain that I never really got into on my blog at the time. It was just too raw then, especially after Dasah died.

They will also see some pieces of our journey that I never shared such as what it was really like in the hospital and the day we buried Sophie. I never wrote about that on the blog. There are also details of some of things going on in my head in the midst of the celebrating of our girls lives that I never shared. There will be a lot that is familiar, but there will be a lot of new things as well, along with some pieces of what God has done since.

Q: You talk about how there aren’t pretty bows tied up at the end.  Why is that important to you for readers to understand?

It may not be encouraging for readers to know, but I think many of us want a “how to” or resolution to our suffering. However, for those who have deeply suffered the loss of dreams, I think they know that no answer or pretty bow will bring the comfort they long for, at least that was true for me.

The bow I did discover was Jesus, and He is a pretty big bow, yet I want readers to understand that I never got answers to my questions. I still don’t understand why God allowed such pain in my life, but He has given me glimpses into the bigger story He is writing. What I did get was more of Him, and confirmation that I am just a small part in an incredible story He is writing for all the ages. Job didn’t understand His story in light of eternity, Abraham didn’t understand His, Moses nope. Mary. She understood such a limited view of how God has allowed us to be a part of bringing His glory to all the world. And we will not know or understand it fully this side of heaven. I think it is important for the reader who is walking through their own pain to realize it frees us to lay our questions at the feet of Jesus, perhaps over and over again, and embrace that the only answer He give is Himself. Then, we have to let that be enough.

I think we want pretty bows so we don’t have to deal with the pain and sorrow grief, death and disappointment leave behind. This is a lifelong journey, but what I want the reader to see is my own story of wrestling and also learning to persevere in this life. In a culture of quick fixes and always looking for silver linings, it’s important to learn to preserve and sit in the questions and ambiguity of this life. I think that is a lost art for believers today. Will I still follow God when He doesn’t make sense to me? How do I follow God when He doesn’t work like I think He should?

Q: You write early on with great conviction, but it seems, continue to wrestle and even wonder if you really believe the things you said earlier. How do you hope the reader experiences your struggle?

Sometimes I would write, and I felt like a hypocrite… did I still believe everything I was writing? This is why the pretty bows/the silver linings are bogus. We serve a God who allows us and wants us know Him, but a lifetime of knowing Him will only touch the surface of who He is.

I think what I have and continue to experience in the Christian life is that it is not a straight line and it is not even an upward line that never falls back down. I’ve tried to depict authentic Christianity—it’s not “I arrive” and now I’m good. It’s a constant drawing near to God, it’s tall mountains, deep valleys, quicksand and up and down we go. Again, our culture likes a forward motion that looks like I’m “getting better” for lack of a better expression, but I think what all these twists and turns are doing in our lives is not “getting us better” but “drawing us nearer” to our God. We are quick to turn around when it gets hard or struggle with the same things over and over. The Christian life is a constant pressing in, a constant posture towards God. This is the life of faithfulness as a believer, not arriving as some “phantom Christian,” but simply learning to trust God, to draw near to Him in whatever He calls us to, mundane or great, joyful or painful.

Learn more about Buried Dreams and Lindsey Dennis at www.vaporandmist.com. She can also be found on Facebook (Vapor and Mist), Twitter (@lindseyrenae) and Instagram (@lindseydennis_).


Thursday, November 1, 2018

Starstruck is out today!

Today is the release day for
Carla Laureano's Starstruck!

It is the second release in her Discovered by Love novella series.


When your fictional hero comes to life on the
big screen, it’s easy to get starstruck…
Unless the leading man happens to be your ex.

BACK COVER COPY:

Novelist Christine Lind has achieved her lifelong dream—a string of best-selling books and a cable-TV adaptation about to go into production. But on her way to London FanFest for the cast reveal, disaster strikes: their leading man is injured in a motorcycle accident… and his replacement is the one person she hoped she’d never seen again.

Nick Cleary has clawed his way to recognition as a Hollywood actor, but it’s long past time he get the chance to show he’s more than a pretty face and a chiseled set of abs. His big break comes in the form of a juicy lead role in a new steampunk fantasy series. There’s just one catch—casting has to be approved by the author… a woman he once devastated through his own youthful stupidity.

Christine is the last person to be starstruck by the handsome heartthrob, but as the clock ticks down to the cast announcement and Nick races to show that he’s really changed, she begins to wonder if there’s more to her ex than his Hollywood persona. Except now the consequences of being wrong no longer apply only to her career… but also to her carefully guarded heart.

AUTHOR BIO:

Carla Laureano is the RITA® Award-winning author of contemporary inspirational romance and Celtic fantasy (as C.E. Laureano). A graduate of Pepperdine University, she worked as a sales and marketing executive for nearly a decade before leaving corporate life behind to write fiction full-time. She currently lives in Denver with her husband and two sons, where she writes during the day and cooks things at night.

Get the first Discovered by Love
novella, Jilted, for free here.


You can buy your copy for $2.99 at:

Amazon/Kindle:

Apple/iTunes:

Google Books:

Kobo:

B&N/Nook:

Sunday, October 28, 2018

The Lord's Army

This is the song you make kids sing to get their wiggle energy out. They need to march around the building, not just the table.


The Lord’s Army

I may never march in the infantry,
Ride in the cavalry,
Shoot the artillery.
I may never fly o’er the enemy,
But I’m in the Lord’s Army!
Yes, sir!

I’m in the Lord’s Army!
Yes, sir!
I’m in the Lord’s Army!
Yes, sir!

I may never march in the infantry,
Ride in the cavalry,
Shoot the artillery.
I may never fly o’er the enemy,
But I’m in the Lord’s Army!
Yes, sir!


Saturday, October 27, 2018

I added a new Seuss quote in this week

As predicted, I'm having a really hard time keeping caught up with Dr. Seuss canvases. I sold out last weekend, and sold 3/5 today at a show that was very small. 

I did add in a new quote for my latest batch.