Saturday, August 31, 2019

I just thought I was finished with house decorating

After getting all my pictures hung up down the hall and in the guest bedroom, I thought I was all finished in fixing up the house for a while. I had really wanted to paint the whole house before I moved in, but for the sake of expense, just did the bedrooms and hall. Other projects were put on the "someday list." After all, my bathroom is the color of mud. 

Then, when Grandmother was over, she gave me some money for a project. I knew that was having the front entry painted. The painter was able to get to it right away, and while he was here, I had him do the kitchen walls. The cabinets could use redoing, but right now, they are a faux finish that hides a lot of dings. I think a fresh coat of paint would reveal more hiccups. 

Everyone had agreed that they didn't like the rust color of both the kitchen and entry. It matched nothing I had. So, I went extreme. Here are the before and afters.



 


I won't lie. We joked about the kitchen color and how the guys at the paint store laughed about it. When it was done, I had some strong feelings of "WHAT THE HECK DID I DO?" But in the few days since, it's starting to grow on me, and I think it will be fine once I hang some plates with darker purple on the walls. It sure makes the kitchen brighter, as if putting in another light.

The entry hall photo doesn't really do justice to the color. Here's another couple of angles once I hung the big picture back up.



Tuesday, August 27, 2019

New releases in the God Made Me children's series

For review copy and interview information, contact:
Audra Jennings - audra@newgrowthpress.com - 903-874-8363

 
We are so excited about these new releases in the
God Made Me Series and think you will be too!
NOW AVAILABLE FOR REVIEW!
Click here to request copies.

 
By signing up to receive these books, you are agreeing to:

1. Post a review on your blog or website within 30 days of receiving the book. Because release dates for these books will vary, all of the books will NOT be sent to you at the same time.
2. Post your review on the New Growth Press website as well as other consumer websites (Amazon, GoodReads, etc.)
3. Share your review via your social media accounts.
4. Email your review link to audra@newgrowthpress.com so that we can share your review via our social media accounts as well.
5. Since we do keep track reviews that are and are not posted, you understand that a failure to post a review on a requested title means you may not be eligible to review future releases.

If you have any questions or concerns, please email Audra Jennings at audra@newgrowthpress.com. 
God Made Me Unique, a beautifully illustrated picture book, helps parents and caregivers teach children that God creates every person in the image of God and each individual has tremendous value, regardless of his or her appearance or abilities.
The story is set in a Sunday school classroom where a new girl, Brie, is introduced by her mom. Brie’s Sunday school teacher takes the time to welcome Brie and to explain to the other children why she is wearing headphones. Through getting to know Brie, the children are guided into a biblical understanding of the uniqueness of each of God’s children. Along the way they learn to ask questions and gain an understanding about their new friend.
Told in a charming rhyming style, this colorful, hardcover book will help eliminate fear and misconceptions about those who have special needs and emphasizes that every person deserves to be treated with kindness and respect.
The back of the book contains a special section just for parents and caregivers that will guide them in how to have biblical, loving conversations with children and gives them additional information and resources to equip them in talking about this important subject.
Like God Made All of Me by Justin and Lindsey Holcomb and God Made Me AND You by Shai Linne, God Made Me Unique gives parents the tools to have important, impactful conversations with their children that will grow their understanding of God, themselves, and others.
About Joni and Friends
Joni and Friends is an organization that accelerates Christian outreach in the disability community. Founded in 1979, their mission is to communicate the gospel and equip Christ-honoring churches worldwide to evangelize and disciple people affected by disability.

The organization authors numerous books including the new releases The Gospel in Hard Times and The Gospel in Hard Times for Students (study guides about suffering in which participants are guided to look to Jesus to understand who God is in the midst of their own suffering and the suffering of others), God Made Me Unique (a children’s book helping parents and caregivers teach children that God creates every person in the image of God), and a series of minibooks providing personal insight & encouragement for tough circumstances.

You can learn more about Joni and Friends at www.joniandfriends.org.
God Made Boys and Girls helps children understand that their gender is a gift from the God who made them and loves them. The story begins as the girls and boys at Grace Christian School are discussing if boys will always be boys and girls will always be girls.
Their teacher explains that God gives each of us the gift of being male or female before we are born, and that you continue to be a boy or a girl whether you like to climb trees or play house, play tag or color pictures, cause a ruckus or sit quietly.
In a world where there is so much confusion about gender and identity, pastor and best-selling author Marty Machowski shares the simple, clear truth that all of us are made in God’s image as either male or female—and what God made is very good!
Included in the back of the book is a special section just for parents and caregivers that gives biblical guidance and help as they have this important conversation with their children.
About the author
Marty Machowski is a Family Life Pastor at Covenant Fellowship Church in Glen Mills, Pennsylvania, where he has served on the pastoral staff for thirty years. Machowski leads Promise Kingdom, the gospel-centered children’s ministry of Covenant Fellowship.

He is the author of numerous resources for churches and families, including The Gospel Story for Kids series, The Ology, and Parenting First Aid. His latest release is the children’s picture book, Don’t Blame the Mud.

Machowski and his wife, Lois, reside in West Chester, Pennsylvania. They have six children and two grandchildren. He is also the Executive Editor for Children’s Resources at New Growth Press.

Learn more at www.martymachowski.com. He can also be found on Twitter (@MartyMachowski).


Sunday, August 25, 2019

The Judges



The Judges

God set Judges over Israel, 
One brave woman, fourteen men.
They helped Israel fight their battles, 
led them back to God from sin.

Othniel, Ehud, Shamgar, Deborah,
Gideon, Abimelech, Tola, Jair,
Jephthah, Ibzan, Elon, Abdon,
Samson, Eli, Samuel.




Saturday, August 24, 2019

My interview with Denise Pass about Shame Off You

An Interview with Denise Pass,
Author of Shame Off You

Enter to win at the end of this blog post!
Shame is an assault on the core of who we are. It assassinates our character, minimizes our worth, and dashes our hope. Like Adam and Eve, we often hide shame, but hiding never heals it. Left unattended, shame can develop into a crippling reality that paralyzes us. Like an infectious disease, shame impacts everyone . . . but not all shame is bad.

Shame can either be an oppressive and powerful tool of worldly condemnation or a source of conviction that God uses to bring his people back to himself. Having the discernment to know the difference and recognize shame in its many forms can change the course of one’s life.

In a transparently honest style, Denise Pass shares of her experience dealing with shame after learning that her former husband was a sexual offender. Having lived through the aftermath, she leads you into God’s Word where you will see for yourself that God is bigger than your pain, shame, mistakes, and limitations.

Shame Off You (available from Abingdon Press) shares how freedom can be found in choosing to break the cycle of shame by learning from the past, developing healthy thinking patterns, silencing lies, and overcoming the traps of vanity and other people’s opinions.

Q: Can you start us off by sharing a little bit of your own story?

I did not realize just how significant of an impact shame had on my life until I started writing this book. I don’t think I recognized all I was experiencing in my life as shame. Shame affected me in profound ways—from worrying to the point of obsession about what others thought of me to shame from my past, present and in the future. Shame was pervasively impacting all of life: how I related to others, processed my perception of myself and responded in social situations. Shame was snuffing out my hope and life, and it felt like I had no way out.

Then in 2007, God revealed to me my (then) husband was a sex offender and some of our children were his victims. This revelation crushed us, and the ensuing shame was crippling. I had waited for marriage and married a Christian man. We were that homeschool family. It did not seem possible. But it was. Through that devastating season, my children and I drew nearer to God, reading the Bible through and clinging to His precious promises. I continued to home educate, and we put one foot in front of the other. Through a five-year long court battle. Through tragic new revelations. Through sorrow up on sorrow and financial woes. God was our God through all of it and the lessons we learned as shame lost its grip on our souls were priceless.

Now, my four oldest are all in college and walking with God, and my youngest son who I adopted from Russia is still home educated by the grace of God. And me? God brought a precious man into my life who I call my Kinsman Redeemer. There’s more about him (my “Bo”—short for Boaz) in the book.

Q: At its root, what is shame, and why is it so detrimental to us?

There are many roots underlying what we call shame.  Shame is the broad term used, but there are so many things interwoven in our culture that we accept as “normal.” Shame is an accusation on our soul that says we are not enough. News flash—we are not enough—but God is. He is our righteousness and removes all of our sin and shame. Shame is peer pressure and the fear of man—we would not have shame if we did not have an audience. Shame is a label or box that imprisons our souls and steals our joy. Shame is detrimental because it gives us a false identity and keeps us from living the abundant life Jesus promises, distracting us from the mission we have been called to.

Q: What are some of the most common underlying sources of shame? Is shame always caused by a sin a person commits him/herself?

Shame is a head game that we do to ourselves most of the time, but there is also plenty of social shaming that goes on—shunning and people condemning one another. While sin invites shame into our lives as a natural consequence, shame is prevalent within our culture. We come by it naturally and so we don’t question it. Expectations cause shame to rise when we don’t meet them. Comparison. Pride. These are huge contributors to the game of shame. The presence of shame in our lives is ultimately a spiritual matter. We feel the truth behind the statement that we are not enough. We accept this condemnation, but it can become our vindication. We are not enough. That’s ok, because Christ is our Righteousness. The enemy of our souls is always accusing us, but our Savior is always interceding for us. 

Q: Shame typically surrounds a situation the public is aware of, at least in the mind of the person walking through it. How can the church community be more supportive of a member suffering with shame?

Great question. We would not have shame if we did not have an audience. It is this fear of man and focus on self that makes us feel so very exposed as we seek acceptance and to snuff out rejection. In my situation, I felt like the church did not know how to handle sex abuse situations, so they didn’t. I was told to be silent. The shame culture thrives in silence. However, being able to talk about it in a God-honoring way and having support instead of isolation would take the sting out of shame and turn it on its head. When we protect the violator and silence the victims, we are propagating and promoting shame.

Q: In what ways do we intentionally or unintentionally heap shame on others?

We live in a society of labels. People try to define one another by false identities based on their performance—good or bad, or their status in this life. When we move away from our identity being in Christ, we find that our identity falls short. Shame was introduced to man in the garden of Eden. We left perfection and chose an insecure, shame-filled culture, instead. Discontent with our lot, comparison and the fear or man have robbed us confidence and plagued us with shame in all of life. Shame is also used as a tool of power by people who seek to subject others, shaming them into submission. And again, shame is in our culture, so it is fairly invisible. We just accept it as part of life, which can cause us to unintentionally continue in the shame culture.

Q: How is Shame Off You set up and designed to be used?

Shame Off You is the story of a girl who shrunk her shame. It is a guide for recognizing the shame all around us and how to rid ourselves of shame biblically. There is a biblical lens of Truth, Humility and Grace that we view shame through, as well as Cycles of Shame and Redemption, a Shame Spectrum and Shame Quiz so we can evaluate how shame is impacting our lives. There is also a resource guide in the back of the book that covers 40 different common shames we might encounter along with Scriptures to combat that shame.

Shame Off You systematically covers everything from feeling shunned and rejected, to being shy, to worrying about what others thought or said about me to traumatic shame that paralyzes us.

Q: What are the steps to overcoming shame?

Shame distracts us from the mission of God and keeps us from living on mission for Christ. It causes us to focus on self and limits our worth. It hurts our relationship with God and others and causes us to live defeated, discouraged lives. It has to be dealt with. Recognizing shame’s presence is necessary to be able to deal with it effectively.

From recognition, we need to discern whether we are dealing with condemnation or conviction. Condemnation is based on works whereas Conviction is based on relationship. Once we know what we are dealing with, we need to consult God’s word and use a biblical filter to evaluate our shame and then let it go. We defeat shame not by mere words. And hiding shame does not heal it. We have to face shame and deal with it biblically to be set free. We don’t get rid of shame because it humbles us—but because it prevents us from living the abundant life Christ promises, reaching those around us.

About the author:

Denise Pass, author of Shame Off You, is an award-winning CCM recording artist and singer-songwriter, accomplished writer/blogger, speaker and worship leader at women’s conferences as well as a worship leader on staff at her home church. After a crushing discovery of her former husband’s hidden life and surviving a painful divorce, she now shares an inspirational message through her ministry, Seeing Deep Ministries, about seeing the deeper truth in God’s word when life hurts.

Denise also founded and directed a home educational co-op for 12 years and engaged in many educational pursuits, including forming and directing a classical children’s choir. A graduate from the University of Maryland, Denise now resides in Virginia, with her “Kinsman Redeemer” husband and five children.

Learn more about Shame Off You at https://shameoffyou.life/the-book. You can also find out more about Denise Pass at DenisePass.com. She can also be found on Facebook (Denise Pass – Author/Speaker/ Worship Leader) and Twitter (@TheDenisePass).



Monday, August 19, 2019

Change Starts When We Finally Face Our Weaknesses


Part 1 of an interview with Tim Riddle and Fil Anderson,
Authors of Blind Spots: What You Don’t See Can Hurt You


To the outside world, examining and exposing your own blind spots can be viewed more as a weakness than a courageous step toward change in your life and relationships. However, true transformative change starts when we finally face our weaknesses—and we all have them. Uncovering our own unseen areas for spiritual growth is impossible without the help of God and trusted individuals. What does Jesus see that we tend to miss, and what does he think about the threats that blind spots pose?

With the release of their book, Blind Spots: What You Don’t See Can Hurt You (New Growth Press), authors Tim Riddle and Fil Anderson discuss Jesus’s primary mission to expose the deadly nature of blind spots, sharing how he alone has the cure.

Q: How did the two of you come together to write Blind Spots? How did the idea evolve?

Tim Riddle
Tim Riddle (TR): I was reflecting on my leadership and all the ups and downs and challenges along the way. I was considering the idea of writing and Fil had been a trusted friend and a spiritual mentor to me for several years. He was also a respected author so I thought I would pick his brain. We briefly talked about writing, but the blind spot idea had not formed yet.

The next morning, I was working out on my bike trainer, but every 5 minutes, I was distracted by an idea or illustration that kept popping into my mind. I would pause and send myself an email so I would not to forget. When I saw Fil later that morning, he stated “I’m glad to see you… I was praying for you this morning.” I inquired about the specifics, and he referenced our conversation about writing. When we compared notes, it was the same time I was riding my bike! I told Fil, “You need to stop praying for me because I can’t get my workout done.” Then I showed him my phone and the 16 emails I had sent myself that morning with ideas about blind spots! In the next couple of days, he offered to mentor and co-author the book with me. I was humbled and thrilled because I have so much respect for Fil.

Q: What is a blind spot you have dealt with personally? How did you first become aware of it?

TR: For me, the personal blind spot that inspired the book was unveiled during an encounter with a team I served. We had recently met, and I was pitching an idea I was passionate about, but it wasn’t going well. There was a moment in the meeting where things got tense and shortly after, the meeting adjourned. Later that week, I became more frustrated with the group and wondered why they appeared to turn against me. We eventually met to talk through the issue, and one member recalled a statement I made in response to one of their questions. I immediately assumed she misheard my words because I would never make that kind of statement. When I brought it to her attention, the entire group affirmed they heard the same thing. I had such a blind spot that I had completely blocked it from my memory. Even to this day, I still don’t recall making the statement the entire group heard. I guess my personal agenda blinded me so much that I lost sight of the relationships in the room.

Fil Anderson
Fil Anderson (FA): There are so many to choose from that I’ll share the most recent. Last evening while my wife and I were dining at an outdoor cafĂ©, I asked her to show me a blind spot. Immediately she asked if I recalled the story she had begun to tell earlier in the evening. Before I could answer, she informed me, “Even if you remember how it began, don’t bother remembering the ending. I never finished the story.”

While I was straining to recall the incident, she continued. “While I was talking, you received a text message. You immediately picked up your phone, began reading, then responding. Feeling invisible, I left the room. You never asked me to finish my story.”

I confess. My phone can be a horrible distraction. When that happens, the effect is like what occurs when I’m driving and change lanes. Suddenly the person I’m with is in a blind spot and becomes invisible.

Q: Are all blind spots truly hidden from our vision or are they sometimes things we are in denial about?

TR: Although some blind spots can be hidden entirely like my story from the previous question, I believe the majority of our blind spots can be classified as denial blind spots. For example, as Christ followers, when we sin, we usually feel bad. But each time we commit the same sin we often feel a little less bad until eventually, we don’t feel anything. It’s almost as if we put our blind spots to sleep like an anesthesiologist in preparation for surgery. Unfortunately, the operation never takes place to remove the issue, and we allow our blind spots to remain sleeping until something dramatic happens to wake us up like a broken marriage, lost job, or fractured relationship.

Q: Is every blind spot a sin? Can you explain how sometimes one is but another is not?

TR: I think our most obvious blind spots are rooted in our sinfulness, but I don’t believe every blind spot is a sin. Here’s an example. I love to speak and teach, but that gift was not revealed until about fifteen years ago. I had no idea it was something God wanted me to pursue. Through my spiritual journey and the encouragement of others, I realized it was something he was calling me to do. I don’t think that blind spot was the result of sin! I think it was something God was waiting to reveal until the right time in my life. However, if you had told me twenty years ago I would be giving hundreds of talks to audiences, I would have denied the possibility. At the time it was simply a blind spot.

Q: How would you encourage people to lovingly point out another person’s blind spot?

FA: Lovingly pointing our another’s blind spot is the most neglected, the most misunderstood, the least practiced, and the most needed communication among Christ-followers today. That’s why we admire and desire Jesus’s courageous, loving, disruptive honesty. He believed and practiced what he preached, that “…the truth will set you free.” (John 8:32)

So, follow Jesus’s example. Lovingly speak the truth to others the way you would like them to do to you. Consider how beneficial it would be to have someone in your life who’s willing to put their friendship with you on the line by being honest with you about your blind spots. Also, remember what you see, the other person does not recognize. Make it a habit to practice this ancient wisdom, “An open rebuke is better than hidden love! Wounds from a sincere friend are better than many kisses from an enemy.” (Proverbs 27:5-6)

For more information about Blind Spots: What You Don’t See Can Hurt You and other releases from New Growth Press, visit www.newgrowthpress.com. You can also learn more at www.discoverblindspots.com.

Sunday, August 18, 2019

The Plagues


The Plague Song
To the tune of “This Old Man”

Then God sent, plague number one
Turned the Nile into blood. 

Chorus:
All the people in Egypt were feeling pretty low; 
Moses told Pharaoh “let them go!”

Then God sent, plague number two
Jumping frogs all over you. (Chorus)

Then God sent, plague number three
Swarms of gnats from head to knee. (Chorus)

Then God sent, plague number four
Filthy flies, need we say more? (Chorus)

Then God sent, plague number five
All the livestock up and died. (Chorus)

Then God sent, plague number six
Boils and sores to make you feel sick. (Chorus)

Then God sent, plague number seven
Hail and lightening down from heaven. (Chorus)

Then God sent, plague number eight
Locust came and they sure ate. (Chorus)

Then God sent, plague number nine
Total darkness all the time. (Chorus)

Then God sent, plague number ten
Pharaoh’s son died so he gave in.

All the people in Egypt were feeling pretty low; 
Finally Pharaoh let them go.





Saturday, August 17, 2019

Hanging 52 pictures

My task for the weekend was to hang up all my travel pictures in my hall and in the guest room. The guest room was the catch all for the past few weeks.

My motivation to get it done was put on fast forward when I found out Grandmother was coming to town to see the house on a few hours notice. I hung 52 pictures on the walls and put out a lot more.

With this, I can say that my house is now done, at least until I get to paint something else.




Eventually, I'd like for this bathroom to be painted turquoise over the chair rail.





Friday, August 16, 2019

Finishing touches on the office

This week, I finally, I say finally because it felt like an eternity since this is where I spend most of my time, got everything hung up and put away in the office.

My desks didn't fit the way I had them before, but I like them better this way anyway. It desperately needed the flowers and other decorations on the walls. 

The lights hanging in the corner used to be in my craft room but work perfect in here.






Thursday, August 15, 2019

Weeping May Last for a Night

*Be sure to enter to win your own copy of
Shame Off You at the end of this blog post!*

Weeping May Last for a Night

Excerpted from Shame Off You by Denise Pass, ©2018 Abingdon Press


What is it about crying that makes us feel shame? We are shamed for being less than perfect, then doubly shamed for crying out for help about it. Sounds like a serious plan of condemnation from the enemy! But what looks like weakness becomes a secret source of strength for those who know and trust in God.

For the record, crying has been given a bad rap. Weeping in cultures all over the world is deemed something to be embarrassed by. Goodness, we even apologize when we do it. Showing emotion is often seen as a sign of weakness, sometimes associated with mental or personality disorders. Add the sting of shame to the feelings of inferiority for just expressing emotions, and the overwhelming humiliation begins to paralyze us and affect our ability to function. Getting to this place of crying out is made even more difficult with the lingering shame for doing so.

But there is another type of crying. Set aside the helpless, I’m-so-ashamed crying. Instead, there is a sweet place of brokenness where we cry out and look to God for comfort. And it is in crying out to God from our place of shame that we obtain victory. Admitting our need is not a display of weakness, but a testament of relationship. But it can be so very hard to admit that aching need. God made us for relationship, to know Him intimately. We were not made for independence, but dependence upon our loving God. There is no shame in that. When we cry out to God, He helps us to recognize the oppressive presence of shame, so we can rightly deal with this stigmatizing emotion.

In Scripture, Hannah felt the scorn from shame in being childless. She knew all too well the taunts of those around her, especially from a rival wife. She wept at the altar. She was not enough. She could not bear children. And there was nothing she could do about it. This is a classic situation of shame. Circumstances we cannot control, yet we somehow accept the shame as if we earned it. But Hannah had a weapon. She cried out to God—the only One who could truly remove her shame. And God answered. Sometimes we have to wait for the Lord to restore. We may have to walk through shame to be able to appreciate the shame being removed from us. Hannah’s tears were counted that day, and the priest serving in the church saw her too:

Hannah was in deep anguish, crying bitterly as she prayed to the Lord. And she made this vow: “O Lord of Heaven’s Armies, if you will look upon my sorrow and answer my prayer and give me a son, then I will give him back to you. He will be yours for his entire lifetime, and as a sign that he has been dedicated to the Lord, his hair will never be cut.” As she was praying to the Lord, Eli watched her. Seeing her lips moving but hearing no sound, he thought she had been drinking. “Must you come here drunk?” he demanded. “Throw away your wine!” “Oh no, sir!” she replied. “I haven’t been drinking wine or anything stronger. But I am very discouraged, and I was pouring out my heart to the Lord. Don’t think I am a wicked woman! For I have been praying out of great anguish and sorrow.” “In that case,” Eli said, “go in peace! May the God of Israel grant the request you have asked of him.” “Oh, thank you, sir!” she exclaimed. Then she went back and began to eat again, and she was no longer sad. (1 Samuel 1:10-18 NLT)

There is so much to learn from Hannah when we are surrounded by shame. She did not try to fix her situation. She did not try to cover up her shame. She simply went to the only One who could. And she wept before her great God, surrendering to His will. But she also did something astonishing in her prayer—she was not merely looking for the release of shame. She wanted to honor God for His removal of it. She would give her son back to Him. Our shame never really is about us after all. It might feel like it, but we feel shame until we come before God. Like a magnet, shame draws us either nearer to God or propels us away. Hannah knew where her help truly came from. She clung to God and let go of her shame. She also knew that the one who commands armies—El Shaddai—could surely remove shame off her soul. She demonstrated this by leaving her shame there at the altar. She did not carry it anymore.

There are many such altars every Sunday where people have the bravery to come up out of their seat and lay their burdens and shames down. The very public transparent display of my shame on that altar initially hurt so deeply. Like Hannah, I did not hold back. It led to confessing the secrets hidden within, the very thing I never wanted to mention again. There I shared what I had been prevented from sharing before. And instead of finding shame and pressure, I found acceptance and compassion. Somehow, I had thought concealing my shame would make my own unwanted testimony disappear. Surely the scorn and condemnation I felt would someday be removed. But hiding shame does not heal it; it makes it multiply. Shame has taken on many forms in my life and colored my world with guilt and humiliation. Shame screams out “condemnation” to a weary soul too tired to fight the accusation. It tries to define us, but we can rise above shame. Shame impacts us all, but it is how we deal with shame that determines the lasting impact shame has on our life.

Shame seems insurmountable and hopeless to us when we listen to it. But that’s what shame does. It makes it seem like there is no way out. Trapped within the walls of our own mind, we don’t even recognize all the shame we are bound by, but we try to combat this shame through our own devices, nonetheless. We might not even be cognizant of our own approaches to deal with shame. Maybe we rationalize it or try to ignore it, but underneath we let shame chip away at our worth. We consider and turn the matter over in our mind a million times, trying to cast off the yoke of shame. Perhaps we allow bitterness to overtake us as we seethe at those who hurt us or who are judging us. Self-made strategies and techniques lack sustaining power to remove an entrenched, invisible force such as shame. Nice anecdotes and willpower cannot extinguish it, either. In all our struggling with shame, could it be that God has a better way to remove shame and that He can even use its presence in our lives for good?


About the author:

Denise Pass, author of Shame Off You, is an award-winning CCM recording artist and singer-songwriter, accomplished writer/blogger, speaker and worship leader at women’s conferences as well as a worship leader on staff at her home church. After a crushing discovery of her former husband’s hidden life as a repetitive sex offender, and surviving a painful divorce, she now shares an inspirational message through her ministry, Seeing Deep Ministries, about seeing the deeper truth in God’s word when life hurts. Denise also founded and directed a home educational co-op for 12 years and engaged in many educational pursuits, including forming and directing a classical children’s choir. A graduate from the University of Maryland, Denise now resides in Virginia, with her “Kinsman Redeemer” husband and five children.

Find her online at DenisePass.com.




Wednesday, August 14, 2019

Time to sign-up for these studies in The Gospel-Centered Life in the Bible series

For review copy and interview information, contact:
Audra Jennings - audra@newgrowthpress.com - 903-874-8363
 
Announcing two new studies in the
Gospel-Centered Life in the Bible series!
NOW AVAILABLE FOR REVIEW!
Click here to request copies.

 
By signing up to receive these books, you are agreeing to:

1. Post a review on your blog or website within 30 days of receiving the book(s).
2. Post your review on the New Growth Press website as well as other consumer websites (Amazon, GoodReads, etc.)
3. Share your review via your social media accounts.
4. Email your review link to audra@newgrowthpress.com so that we can share your review via our social media accounts as well.
5. Since we do keep track reviews that are and are not posted, you understand that a failure to post a review on a requested title means you may not be eligible to review future releases.

If you have any questions or concerns, please email Audra Jennings at audra@newgrowthpress.com. 
This small group guide includes ten in-depth lessons for one-to-one discipleship, small group, or large group settings. Explore this resource and find a God who relents, a God who is sovereign, and a God who is present among the mercies and trials of life.
Jonah: Grace for Sinners and Saints offers Scripture-based, theologically rich content with an easy-to-follow structure to engage readers. Duguid explores how we are more like Jonah than we might think, bringing the text to life by examining our own motives and affections. 
Duguid doesn’t leave readers in the judgment and spiritual arrogance of Jonah. He shows us the good news that the Lord is in charge, even over those who try to run from him. 
With rich discussion questions, exercises, and articles to encourage thoughtful responses to the text, this study guide helps readers see Jesus more clearly in the themes found in the book of Jonah. 
AUTHOR
Iain M. Duguid received his PhD at the University of Cambridge in 1992, his MDiv at Westminster Theological Seminary in 1989, and his BSc at the University of Edinburgh in 1981. He’s the author of Ezekiel and the Leaders of Israel, Esther & Ruth, Daniel, Song of Songs in the Reformed Expository Commentary, as well as many other titles. Duguid is a professor of Old Testament at Westminster Theological Seminary. He and his wife, Barbara, have been married for more than thirty years and have six adult children.
In this ten-week accessible study, Jared Wilson provides a clearer picture of Jesus through the story of Ruth, which he presents as a historic living parable of Christ’s love for his church.
Ruth: Redemption for the Broken can be adapted for one-to-one discipleship, small group, or large group settings. The comprehensive leader’s guide is included in the text, making it an easy-to-follow structure to engage men and women.
By studying the book of Ruth, readers can enjoy the romance and drama of this compelling story while understanding how it applies to their own lives—finding Christ’s undying love for them through this unforgettable biblical narrative.
Jesus is the “truer and better” of every character in the book of Ruth, and everything in the Bible points to him. Wilson anchors his message in Scripture, guiding readers to better understand the themes in the book of Ruth.
When everything falls apart, cling to Jesus, the one who clings to you. Find in the story of Ruth the start of a real love story—but probably not the one you think. Ruth reveals the truth that there are no sinners, no failures, and no victims so far gone that the sovereign hand of the Lord cannot reach, rescue, and even revise the story of their lives.
AUTHOR
Jared C. Wilson is the Director of Content Strategy for Midwestern Seminary, managing editor of For the Church, and director of the Pastoral Training Center at Liberty Baptist Church in Kansas City, MO. He is the author of numerous books, including Gospel Wakefulness, The Imperfect Disciple, and Supernatural Power for Everyday People. In ministry for over twenty years, Wilson has also written numerous church resources and Bible studies, as well as contributed the study notes for 1 and 2 Peter and Jude in the ESV Gospel Transformation Bible. He is a graduate of Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro, TN.