Saturday, September 30, 2017

Thank goodness for "fall"

Thank goodness for "fall." Even though it's still like 90 outside, I know it is technically fall. The Crafty Dad and Daughter loves fall. That's when the good craft shows are!

This weekend started the first of our 8 craft events. We have four weekends in a row, 1 off, 2 more, 2 off, 2 more. In other words, 6 out of 7 weekends in a row. 

It was a long day at Birdville High School though. Set-up was Saturday morning. We were there by 6 AM, barely got everything up by 9 AM. The event lasted until 5 PM, then we had to pack up and come home. 

I may be a zombie by December 10! 

You can't even see everything in these pictures, but if you see something you want, I'll ship it to you!



Friday, September 29, 2017

Randy Singer’s latest release is equal parts legal, political and military thriller

Author of Rule of Law

In a world of political accusations and threats of war, what does the public need to know, and what is better left unsaid for our own protection? Are our leaders following the Rule of Law or acting outside it? In his latest legal thriller, Rule of Law (Tyndale House Publishers/September 5, 2017), award-winning author and attorney Randy Singer weaves a gripping page-turner that explores the inner workings of the White House, the CIA and the State Department in dealings with foreign governments. Drawing from one of his own recent cases, Singer gives readers a glimpse of what is really going on behind the headlines of today’s international events.

Q: In the author’s note of Rule of Law you explain you wrote the book to address some critical issues lurking on the horizon. What are some concerns you have that Americans should be aware of?

Throughout the past several years, the CIA has become a much more militaristic organization, using drones and special forces to fight shadow wars in countries where we have not officially declared war. There are consequences to this. Drone strikes sometimes kill innocent civilians. Religious leaders who are not technically enemy combatants are targeted and killed. This in turn breeds contempt for America in the countries where it happens.

Under the Bush administration, the United States was widely criticized for using enhanced interrogation techniques on enemy combatants. During the Obama administration, methods changed to the use of drone strikes on many suspected terrorist leaders and operatives. Such summary executions are sometimes based on nothing more than the traffic pattern and aerial surveillance at a house that gives rise to suspicions of a terrorist planning center, sometimes called a “signature strike.” No longer are drone strikes confined to known terrorist leaders on a CIA or JSOC list. Often, the actual identity of the victims is entirely unknown.

What is worse: capturing terrorists for enhanced interrogation (for which the media roundly criticized Bush) or the summary execution of suspected enemies with no judicial process that characterized the Obama administration (and shows no sign of slowing during Trump’s time in office)? Studies show that, to the extent victims can be identified positively, only a small percent of drone-strike victims were in fact mid- or top-tier terrorist leaders. We must be careful that, in our war on terror, we don’t adopt means of warfare that violate our commitment to rule of law and due process.

Q: Without getting into the details of specific cases, can you share how you’ve gained personal knowledge about some of the situations you write about in Rule of Law? Was the book inspired by actual events?

Sure. As a lawyer, I am involved in anti-terrorism lawsuits that I file on behalf of terrorist victims against state sponsors of terrorism such as Iran and Syria. One of those cases involved the capture and imprisonment of two U.N. workers by the Houthi rebels in Yemen. One of the men made it out alive, but tragically the other was killed after trying to escape. Rule of Law begins with a SEAL rescue mission for two political prisoners held hostage by the Houthi rebels.

Q: How similar to past or current administrations is the cast of the government you created?

I tried to create an entirely fictional administration and Supreme Court that is not at all like the current or past administrations. I did this because people often react to things based on their political preferences, and I wanted to write a story that wouldn’t let us to jump to conclusions without thinking about the deeper issues involved.

Q: Rule of Law is a legal term. For those of us not familiar with “legalese,” what does the term mean, and how does it apply to international settings?

Rule of Law means we are all subject to and accountable to the law, which is supposed to be fairly and evenly applied. In other words, we are all equal in the eyes of the law, from the president to the homeless person on the streets of Washington, D.C. This is a bedrock part of our democracy. The rule of law replaces the arbitrary dictates of powerful rulers with the fairness and equity of the law.

Q: In the story, you pose the question, “Is the president above the law, or does the law govern even the most powerful?” Given today’s political climate, there’s enough difference of opinion to start a civil war. What’s your take on this question?

Great question. Unlike most people, I actually think the present administration is strengthening the rule of law. President Trump is certainly unconventional and strong-willed (that’s an understatement!), showing less deference to the rule of law than any prior administration. However, in pushing the boundaries of what one powerful man can do, he is testing the rule of law and by doing so strengthening our commitment to it. He is like the kid in class who is always testing the teacher. If the teacher can uphold discipline in that environment, he or she becomes more respected than ever before. Similarly, we are seeing that even a powerful and maverick president such as Trump is constrained in positive ways by the school-marm named rule of law.

Q: Are we sacrificing our ideals as a nation to win the war on terror?

There are two great dangers here. First, that we allow encroachments on our individual liberties by our own government that we would never have allowed apart from our fear of terrorism. As a defense lawyer, I know the federal government (and especially federal prosecutors) have a frightening amount of power that can destroy even innocent citizens. Their investigative tools and ability to layer on charges based on the wire fraud and conspiracy statutes, combined with the way they can freeze any defendant’s assets as part of a forfeiture action, make it nearly impossible to fight federal charges. We have tilted the scales of justice too far in favor of the prosecutors, sacrificing our individual liberties. Second, I am concerned we are fighting the war on terror in a way we would never have tolerated as a nation even 20 years ago. We must be careful that in destroying the devil, we don’t become one of his demons.

Q: Given all that is going on in this world, is there anything we can do about it? Do we need to be better informed, and if so, how do we learn the truth about what is happening around us?

Two things might help us be better informed. The first is travel. Many Americans understand very little about Middle East culture and politics because it all seems so complicated and overwhelming. There is a huge need right now for people to be part of the relief efforts for refugees displaced by ISIS. When you get to know people and help meet their needs, you naturally learn about the politics and culture of their region and care more about it. Second, we should all probably broaden our sources of news. Many of us watch our favorite cable channels and listen to “experts” rehash the same types of stories over and over. We need to go more in-depth and spend less time in the echo chambers. This can be done with blogs or by reading more serious journals/reports so the issues don’t have to be reduced to two-minute sound bites.

Learn more about Randy Singer and Rule of Law at www.randysinger.net.


Thursday, September 28, 2017

Bringing Maggie Home


Dive into the story of a seventy-year-old unsolved mystery spanning three generations of women in Kim Vogel Sawyer’s new book, Bringing Maggie Home. When a traffic accident forces Meghan to take a six-week leave-of-absence to recover, all three generations of DeFord women find themselves unexpectedly under the same roof. Meghan knows she will have to act as a mediator between her headstrong and contentious mother and grandmother. Will Meghan also be able to use her investigative prowess to solve the family mystery and help both women recover all that’s been lost?

{MORE ABOUT BRINGING MAGGIE HOME}


(WaterBrook, September 2017)
Decades of loss, an unsolved mystery, and a rift spanning three generations
Hazel DeFord is a woman haunted by her past. While berry picking in a blackberry thicket in 1943, ten-year old Hazel momentarily turns her back on her three-year old sister Maggie and the young girl disappears.
Almost seventy years later, the mystery remains unsolved and the secret guilt Hazel carries has alienated her from her daughter Diane, who can’t understand her mother’s overprotectiveness and near paranoia. While Diane resents her mother’s inexplicable eccentricities, her daughter Meghan—a cold case agent—cherishes her grandmother’s lavish attention and affection.
When a traffic accident forces Meghan to take a six-week leave-of-absence to recover, all three generations of DeFord women find themselves unexpectedly under the same roof. Meghan knows she will have to act as a mediator between the two headstrong and contentious women. But when they uncover Hazel’s painful secret, will Meghan also be able to use her investigative prowess to solve the family mystery and help both women recover all that’s been lost?
Kim Vogel Sawyer

{MORE ABOUT KIM VOGEL SAWYER}


Kim Vogel Sawyer is a highly acclaimed, best-selling author with more than one million books in print, in several different languages. Her titles have earned numerous accolades including the ACFW Carol Award, the Inspirational Readers Choice Award, and the Gayle Wilson Award of Excellence. Kim lives in central Kansas with her retired military husband Don, where she continues to write gentle stories of hope and redemption. She enjoys spending time with her three daughters and grandchildren.
Find out more about Kim at http://www.kimvogelsawyer.com/.

Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Lessons in how to live and how to die


Lessons in how to live and how to die
Becky Baudouin shares priceless lessons her mother
revealed during her battle with cancer

“I’ve taught you how to live; now I want to teach you how to die. You don’t have to be afraid.” When Becky Baudouin’s mother spoke those words to her, they weren't said lightly. Her mother had an inoperable tumor — and after months of treatment, there was no hope for a longer life. There was, however, assurance of everlasting life. In Cancer, Faith, and Unexpected Joy: What My Mother Taught Me About How to Live and How to Die (Kregel Publications/September 26, 2017/ISBN: 9780825444746/$14.99), Baudouin shares the invaluable wisdom imparted by her mother during her final days.

Upon learning of her mother’s diagnosis, Baudouin made a decision she knew she would not regret. “I decided to rearrange my priorities so I could show up and be fully present with my mom during her illness. I knew I needed to pull back from some of the groups and activities I was in so I would have the energy and time to take care of myself and my family and to take frequent trips to be with my mom. I realized I had limited time and resources and knew it was a season that wouldn’t last forever.”

A writer by profession, Baudouin had always kept a journal. While she did not initially set out to write a book, it was a natural progression. “Writing is and always has been one of the ways I process what is happening and what I am learning. Sometimes I can’t even process something that happens until I write about it. During my mom’s illness, I had a strong sense I needed to write things down. I wanted to be able to remember things she said and did and what I was feeling, and to share these things with my daughters.”

However, Cancer, Faith, and Unexpected Joy, is much more than a memoir. Baudouin equips readers to face death from a Christian perspective by sharing her insights on fear, loss and grief. These honest insights are applicable to everyone's story, not just her own, and can extend real comfort to every reader. Questions for personal reflection or group discussion help both those who are losing a loved one and those who are facing death. Baudouin’s story reveals God is the only source for a spirit's true healing.

Baudouin digs into the sensitive areas people are often hesitant to talk about:

  • What to do and say when someone has received bad news
  • Inviting others into your journey and asking for help
  • Grieving as you go
  • Fear of the unknown
  • Facing life after loss

For anyone living with the tension of wanting to hold on yet needing to let go, Cancer, Faith, and Unexpected Joy demonstrates a powerful and profound love. “The last lesson my mom taught me was surrender,” Baudouin shares. “She taught me what it looks like to surrender, especially when things turn out differently than we had hoped. She accepted what was happening, even though we had prayed for something different. She entrusted herself to the One who is all-loving and wise and trusted in His plan. This posture of surrender brought a deep, abiding sense of peace leading up to her final moments on this earth. She was deeply at peace and taught us that when we surrender to God, we really don’t need to be afraid. He is completely trustworthy.”


About the Author

Becky Baudouin (pronounced Beau-dwen) is a freelance writer and speaker and a former columnist for Chicago’s Daily Herald newspaper. Her three daughters supplied her with enough material for a five-year run with her column, “A Mom’s Point of View.” She has written for the marriage ministry at Willow Creek Community Church where she is an active member, and several of her articles have been published in Focus on the Family’s magazine.

Baudouin loves speaking just as much as writing and speaks at Chicago-area MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers) groups and women’s events on topics such as parenting, marriage and faith. She believes in the power of groups and helps lead marriage and grief workshops, walking alongside those in seasons of difficulty and loss. She loves to cook and works part-time as a personal prep chef. Her favorite place to be is around her dining room table, sharing great food and connecting with family and friends.

She grew up in northern Michigan and now lives in the Chicago area with her husband, Bernie, and their three daughters.


Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Counseling Under the Cross

Revolutionize your understanding of soul care by studying Martin Luther’s reformed theology in Bob Kellemen’s new book, Counseling Under the Cross. The book will guide pastors, counselors, lay leaders, and friends toward a rich understanding of the gospel that will directly impact their personal ministry to others. Through lively vignettes, real-life stories, and direct quotes from Luther, readers will be equipped to apply the gospel to themselves and others so together they find their hope and help in Christ alone.

{MORE ABOUT COUNSELING UNDER THE CROSS}


Counseling Under the Cross: How Martin Luther Applied the Gospel to Daily Life
(New Growth Press, September 2017)
Martin Luther not only reformed theology, but his understanding of the gospel revolutionized soul care.
In Counseling Under the Cross, biblical counselor and noted author Bob Kellemen explains how Martin Luther’s gospel-centered and cross-focused pastoral care transformed his own approach to soul care.
As Kellemen mines Luther’s own writings and other first hand accounts, readers will gain a new understanding of how Luther richly, relevantly, robustly, and relationally applied the gospel to suffering, sin, sanctification, and our search for peace with God. Counseling Under the Cross will guide pastors, counselors, lay leaders, and friends toward a rich understanding of the gospel that will directly impact their personal ministry to others.
Through lively vignettes, real-life stories, and direct quotes from Luther, readers will be equipped to apply the gospel to themselves and others so together they find their hope and help in Christ alone.
Bob Kellemen

{MORE ABOUT BOB KELLEMEN}


Robert W. Kellemen, PhD, is the Vice President for Institutional Advancement and Chair of the Biblical Counseling Department at Crossroads Bible College and the founder and CEO of RPM Ministries. He is also the author of many books, including Gospel-Centered Counseling and Gospel Conversations. Bob and his wife Shirley have two children and two grandchildren.
Find out more about Bob at http://www.rpmministries.org.

Monday, September 25, 2017

Come out to Birdville this weekend!

If you live anywhere near Birdville High School
on Saturday, September 30!


Yes, some people are out of their cotton pickin' minds

I started making these signs before a couple of people decided to start an online storm shaming Hobby Lobby and Cracker Barrel for selling cotton decorations. I've had more interest after the social media posts this week than before.

I found some purple burlap I had to have to dress up a sign instead of the traditional tan color. I don't think it's going to take long to sell this variation as it is more purple than the photo lets on when you see it in person.


Sunday, September 24, 2017

Pharaoh, Pharaoh

The boys didn't know this quite as well as they claimed. ;)


Pharaoh, Pharaoh

Well a burnin’ bush told me just the other day
That I should come over here and stay
Got to get God’s people out of Pharaoh’s hand.
And lead them out to the promised land.

Chorus:
Pharaoh, Pharaoh Woa-o
Let my people go!
Yea, Yea, Yea, Yea, Yea... (repeat chorus)

So me and God’s people going to the Red Sea
Pharaoh’s army comin’ after me.
I raised my rod, stuck it in the sand
And all God’s children walked on the dry land

Chorus

Well, Old Pharaoh’s army was a comin’ too.
So what did you think that I did do?
I raised my rod and I cleared my throat
And Pharaoh’s army did the dead man’s float.

Chorus

Friday, September 22, 2017

Thankful not to work in Dallas

I had a rare work-out-of-the-office day. I took meetings at the American Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW) conference at the Gaylord Texan in Grapevine today.

It was really nice to get out and see people. 


It was not nice to get stuck about right here at 4:45 PM on a Friday afternoon though it can be like this at any time in Dallas. I'm so glad I don't have to deal with this daily. It also reminded me a lot of getting stuck right here on the way home from college for the weekend. Deja vu.


Thursday, September 21, 2017

Ta’Mara Hanscom’s ‘The Pretender’ Blog Tour and Giveaway

Despite just meeting each other, Tillie and Noah’s lives have been mysteriously intertwined for many years in Ta’Mara Hanscom’s The Pretender. From the moment they met, Tillie and Noah wanted to spend the rest of their lives together, but a deliberate omission will keep them apart—and that same omission will be responsible for the escape of a murderer, and a bride’s deception.

Join Ta'Mara in celebrating the release of the second printing and new covers by entering to win her $75 prize basket giveaway!

 

One grand prize winner will receive:
  • A copy of The Pretender
  • A $75 Amazon gift card
  • A decorative box containing measuring cups, ten recipes from the book, a potholder, a kitchen towel, pepper and salt grinders, kitchen utensils, and an olive oil dispenser
 

Enter today by clicking the icon below, but hurry! The giveaway ends on October 11. The winner will be announced October 12 on the Litfuse blog.


{MORE ABOUT THE PRETENDER}


The Pretender: A Blackguard in Disguise (Reata Publishing, September 2017)
Set in South Dakota in 1975, where eighteen-year-olds could order 3.2 beer in a bar, and loaded guns were kept under the counter.
Frankie Valli sang “My Eyes Adored You,” and American soldiers returning from Vietnam struggled with their new reality.
It’s within this tumultuous season of American history that Tillie Caselli meets Noah Hansen, and they are never the same again. Their lives were mysteriously intertwined—and had been for many years—yet they had no idea.
From the moment they met, Tillie and Noah wanted to spend the rest of their lives together, but a deliberate omission will keep them apart—and that same omission will be responsible for the escape of a murderer, and a bride’s deception.

Ta'Mara Hanscom

{MORE ABOUT TA’MARA HANSCOM}


Born and raised in South Dakota, Ta`Mara loves to write about the Great Plains and the beauty and people of Italia. While her husband and children manage their two pizza ristoranti, Ta`Mara works full time on The Caselli Family Series, and ministers to women. It is Ta`Mara s prayer that as the readers explore the truths in these volumes, they will come away with a new perspective on love, forgiveness, obedience, and God’s plan for marriage
Find out more about Ta’Mara at https://www.tamarahanscombooks.com.

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

How would your life be different if you grew up in another family?

Author of Gathering the Threads
  
How different would your belief system be if you grew up in a different culture? Would your faith in God be the same if you were raised in a different family? New York Times best-selling author Cindy Woodsmall poses these questions in the powerful conclusion to the CBA and ECPA bestselling Amish of Summer Grove series in Gathering the Threads (WaterBrook/August 15, 2017).

Q: The Amish of Summer Grove series introduces readers to a pair of girls, one Englisch and one Amish, who were switched at birth. What are some of the challenges each faced when pushed to experience the life she would have lived had the switch never taken place?

Ariana, who was raised Amish, battles to keep her sanity and survive in a lifestyle she’d never considered living. Her biological dad has devised what he calls a “bucket list” because he believes if she returns to the Amish ways, her life will be over. Her thinking and faith are undermined at every turn, and the changes demanded of her break her in ways her Englisch dad can’t understand. She finds it appalling he wants her to remove her prayer Kapp and wear modern clothes. She struggles when he insists she have some length cut from her hair. She’s never had scissors used on her hair. She must learn to drive. She also must study various religions and learn the original meaning of words in the Bible. Her biological dad’s goal is to undo her religious beliefs.

Skylar, who was raised Englisch, agreed to live with her Amish family to avoid rehab. She’s used to living a very comfortable lifestyle. The Englisch parents who raised her were never married and never lived together, so she’s learned throughout the years how to play them against each other to get what she wants. Suddenly she’s in a poor home, stripped of her cell phone, electronics and spending money. Her immediate challenge upon arrival in the Amish community is how to score prescription drugs. A tight-knit family and community is foreign to her. Manipulating her authorities isn’t easy, and in this home everyone works to put food on the table and to keep a roof over their heads.

Q: What are some of the questions about identity the girls must work through as they adjust to life with their new families?

Ariana’s journey is about coming to a place of not submitting to the authority over her when she thinks and sees things differently than that authority does.

In book two, Fraying at the Edge, Ariana adjusted to life with her Englischer family. Three months later she comes home, and that’s where Gathering the Threads opens. She left as a sweet, obedient Amish woman, and now she’s being accused of bringing the world into her insular Amish community. Yet she can’t compromise the gains she has made in her own personality and in her relationships. Is she still the “rule follower,” or is she now an “activist,” pushing others to open their eyes to see a broader life and a bigger God?

Skylar feels rejected by both families, passed over in favor of the “good” and “giving” Ariana. Skylar needs to work through her jealousy and her desire to put herself above others, but can she? Being self-centered comes naturally for her.

Q: Today’s news stories, even our social media feeds, are full of people arguing and treating each other poorly due to a difference of opinions. As Christians, how can we be respectful of others’ beliefs while standing for the truth?

Ariana wrestles with this very thing in Fraying at the Edge when she is living with her birth parents. In Gathering the Threads, she’s returned to her Amish community a changed woman who must stand up to some of the backward thinking and biases her older bishop holds.

It’s important to remember we have the ability, even when we are overwhelmed with emotions, not to dump our feelings on others. It’s helpful to remind ourselves we are all wrong at times. We’ve all had situations take place where we were lied to or were misinformed. If we’re as right as we think, why lose our temper over it?

I remember telling my mom about something really negative someone had said about me, and my mom asked, “Is it true?”

I shook my head, “No.”

“I don’t think so either, but always ask yourself if what was said is true. If it is, look at yourself and choose to change. If it’s not true, ignore it and move on.”

When we don’t like something, anger is our go-to response. It begins quite young for all people. Toddlers, regardless of ethnicity or socioeconomic background, are known for throwing tantrums.

As adults, we don’t have to let anger take control of us. We can take control and be in control. We can deal with our overwrought emotions in a way that makes us stronger and tomorrow better.

Q: Ariana was deeply conflicted between respecting the parents who raised her and the pull of the world outside the Amish community. How was she able to balance the two sides and still hold on to her faith?

Her emotions were a wreck much of the time, but she didn’t let them have the last say or rule her actions. She could see the extremes in each lifestyle — the Amish and Englisch — and she saw each way of life had strengths and weaknesses. When too confused to know what to believe, she talked to Quill, a good friend she rarely agreed with but who’d been through many of the same things as Ariana. He took her to a planetarium, her first time to go to one, to view images from the Hubble telescope of the universe and galaxies. While there she saw the power and awesomeness of God and realized He was bigger than anyone could understand. Suddenly faith wasn’t about rules and lifestyles. It was about the God of energy and light and creation beyond what she could comprehend. She saw God had a way for her tiny life in the huge universe to be what He designed it to be. 

Q: Explain the meaning behind the title of the book. In what ways was Ariana a “gatherer of threads”?

Quill’s Mamm, Berta, gave Ariana the name “Thread Gatherer.” She said life was like an heirloom quilt; life ripped at the seams. Gathers are rare. Ariana took the frayed pieces and worked with them until the quilt could fulfill its purpose once again.

Throughout the tumultuous events of this series, a lesser person would have left the whole situation — Ariana is an adult after all. The Amish community feels she returned to them bringing the world with her. However, she stuck with her families, both Amish and Englisch, and worked all the frayed and broken pieces together until their bond was stronger than ever.


Learn more about Woodsmall and her books at www.cindywoodsmall.com. She is also active on Facebook (@authorcindywoodsmall). 

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Lori Benton's Many Sparrows


Travel back in time to the Ohio-Kentucky frontier in 1774 as it pulses with rising tension and brutal conflicts and meet Clare, who is determined to emerge from the wilderness with her children, in Lori Benton’s new book, Many Sparrows. Clare will face the greatest fight of her life, as she struggles to reclaim her son from the Shawnee Indians now holding him captive. But with the battle lines sharply drawn, her son’s life might not be the only one at stake. Can a stranger convince Clare that recovering her son will require the very thing her anguished heart is unwilling to do—be still, wait and let God fight this battle for them?

{MORE ABOUT MANY SPARROWS}


(WaterBrook, August 2017)
Either she and her children would emerge from that wilderness together, or none of them would. . . .
In 1774, the Ohio-Kentucky frontier pulses with rising tension and brutal conflicts as Colonists push westward and encroach upon Native American territories. The young Inglesby family is making the perilous journey west when an accident sends Philip back to Redstone Fort for help, forcing him to leave his pregnant wife Clare and their four-year old son Jacob on a remote mountain trail.
When Philip does not return and Jacob disappears from the wagon under the cover of darkness, Clare awakens the next morning to find herself utterly alone, in labor and wondering how she can to recover her son . . . especially when her second child is moments away from being born.
Clare will face the greatest fight of her life, as she struggles to reclaim her son from the Shawnee Indians now holding him captive. But with the battle lines sharply drawn, Jacob’s life might not be the only one at stake. When frontiersman Jeremiah Ring comes to her aid, can the stranger convince Clare that recovering her son will require the very thing her anguished heart is unwilling to do—be still, wait and let God fight this battle for them?
Lori Benton

{MORE ABOUT LORI BENTON}


Lori Benton was raised east of the Appalachian Mountains, surrounded by early American history going back three hundred years. Her novels transport readers to the eighteenth century, where she brings to life the Colonial and early Federal periods of American history. When she isn’t writing, reading, or researching, Lori enjoys exploring and photographing the Oregon wilderness with her husband. She is the author of “Burning Sky,” recipient of three Christy Awards, “The Pursuit of Tamsen Littlejohn,” Christy-nominee “The Wood’s Edge,” and “A Flight of Arrows.”
Find out more about Lori at http://loribenton.blogspot.com.

Monday, September 18, 2017

Randy Singer's Rule of Law

Did the president play political games with the lives of U.S. service members? Add Randy Singer’s new legal thriller, Rule of Law, to your must-read list this fall. For the members of SEAL Team Six, it was a rare mission ordered by the president, monitored in real time from the Situation Room. But when the mission results in spectacular failure, the finger-pointing goes all the way to the top. Paige Chambers, a determined young lawyer, has a very personal reason for wanting to know what happened. But will equal justice under law work when one of the most powerful people on the planet is also a defendant?

{MORE ABOUT RULE OF LAW}


(Tyndale, September 2017)
What did the president know? And when did she know it?
For the members of SEAL Team Six, it was a rare mission ordered by the president, monitored in real time from the Situation Room. The Houthi rebels in Yemen had captured an American journalist and a member of the Saudi royal family. Their executions were scheduled for Easter Sunday. The SEAL team would break them out.
But when the mission results in spectacular failure, the finger-pointing goes all the way to the top.
Did the president play political games with the lives of U.S. service members?
Paige Chambers, a determined young lawyer, has a very personal reason for wanting to know the answer. The case she files will polarize the nation and test the resiliency of the Constitution. The stakes are huge, the alliances shaky, and she will be left to wonder if the saying on the Supreme Court building still holds true.
Equal justice under law.
It makes a nice motto. But will it work when one of the most powerful people on the planet is also a defendant?
Randy Singer

{MORE ABOUT RANDY SINGER}


Randy Singer is a critically acclaimed author and veteran trial attorney. He has penned more than ten legal thrillers, including his award-winning debut novel “Directed Verdict.” In addition to his law practice and writing, he serves as a teaching pastor for Trinity Church in Virginia Beach, Virginia. He also teaches classes in advocacy and ethics at Regent Law School and serves on the school’s Board of Visitors.
Find out more about Randy at http://www.randysinger.net.