Thursday, November 30, 2017

‘All Things Now Living’ Blog Tour and Kindle Fire Giveaway

While on a scavenging trip with her father, Amy is accidentally trapped in New Lithisle in Rondi Bauer Olson's All Things Now Living. At first her only goal is to escape, but when she meets Daniel, a New Lithisle boy, she begins to question how less-than-human the people of New Lithisle are. Amy’s feelings grow even more conflicted when she learns she didn’t end up in New Lithisle by mistake. Her father is secretly a sympathizer. Time is running short and Amy has to decide if she will bring the computer program her father wrote to his contact or save herself. Installing the program could prevent the dome’s collapse, but if Amy doesn’t find her father’s contact in time, she’ll die, along with everyone else.

Stay up all night reading this thrilling new book from Rondi and enter to win a Kindle Fire!

 

One grand prize winner will receive:
  • A copy of All Things Now Living
  • A Kindle Fire
Enter today by clicking the icon below, but hurry! The giveaway ends on December 14. The winner will be announced December 15 on the Litfuse blog.




{MORE ABOUT ALL THINGS NOW LIVING}


(Written World Communications, May 2017)
Her whole life Amy has been taught the people of New Lithisle deserve to die, but when she falls for Daniel, she determines to save him.
Sixteen-year-old Amy doesn’t like anything to die, she won’t even eat the goats or chickens her mama has butchered every fall, but she can’t let herself pity the inhabitants of New Lithisle. In a few short months the dome they built to isolate themselves from the deadly pandemic is predicted to collapse, but her whole life Amy has been taught it’s God’s will they die. They traded their souls for immunity to the swine flu virus, brought God’s curse upon themselves by adding pig genes to their own.
Then, while on a scavenging trip with her father, Amy is accidentally trapped in New Lithisle. At first her only goal is to escape, but when she meets Daniel, a New Lithisle boy, she begins to question how less-than-human the people of New Lithisle are.
Amy’s feelings grow even more conflicted when she learns she didn’t end up in New Lithisle by mistake. Her father is secretly a sympathizer, and was trying to prevent the coming destruction.
Now time is running short and Amy has to decide if she will bring the computer program her father wrote to his contact or save herself. Installing the program could prevent the dome’s collapse, but if Amy doesn’t find her father’s contact in time, she’ll die, along with everyone else.
Rondi Olson

{MORE ABOUT RONDI OLSON}


Rondi Bauer Olson is a reader and writer from Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, where she lives on a hobby farm with her husband, Kurt. She has four grown children, works as a nurse, and also owns a gift shop within view of beautiful Lake Superior.
Find out more about Rondi at http://rondibauerolson.weebly.com.

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Gospel-Centered Stories for Young Children



New book traces God’s perfect promises
for toddlers and preschoolers

In today’s world where the word promise doesn’t hold the value that it used to, we still encourage our children early on to learn what a promise is, and more importantly, what it means to keep one. While all promises have value, the promises God makes to his people are more valuable than anyone could ever think of or imagine—and our God always keeps his promises.

In The Beginner’s Gospel Story Bible (November 13, 2017/New Growth Press),  Jared Kennedy traces the perfect promises of God through fifty-two Old and New Testament stories, retelling them in simple and compelling ways with toddlers and preschoolers in mind. Each gospel-centered story highlights God’s tale of redemption through Jesus and the unexpected and surprising ways that God’s grace and mercy are revealed throughout the Bible.   

“While there are a number of preschool and children’s story Bibles from a gospel-centered perspective, there has been very little written in recent years for toddlers,” says Kennedy. “My prayer is that our youngest children will come to know that God has spoken his promises for them, that he keeps his promises, and that the way he keeps them is both surprising and life changing.”

Each of the fifty-two stories is accompanied by brightly colored illustrations by Trish Mahoney that both highlight the story and add fun teaching elements of counting, opposites, patterns, and object recognition to keep even the youngest child’s attention. The stories also end with a question that parents and caregivers can use to further reinforce the message. Parents are encouraged to read the story one chapter at a time to their children—or have their children read it to them!—and by choosing to read one story per week, families can create a one-year Bible curriculum.

Kennedy, who leads the children’s ministry creative team as Pastor of Families at Sojourn Community Church – Midtown in Louisville, Kentucky, designed The Beginner’s Gospel Story Bible to hold even a toddler’s attention, so they can come to know God’s promises are especially for them, and God always keeps his promises.

“Jared Kennedy has created a spectacular resource to help us teach the Bible to our youngest children,” says Marty Machowski, a pastor and author of The Ology, The Gospel Story Bible, and other books and curriculum for the church and family. “Though the language is simple enough for toddlers, the gospel truth it carries can and will transform lives. The illustrations compliment the story, creating a colorful journey for children as they discover the promises of God and how they are fulfilled in Jesus Christ. I will be placing a copy of this book in all our children’s ministry classrooms and recommending that every family in our church with small children add it to their bookshelf.”


Jared Kennedy, MDiv, ThM, is the husband to Megan and the father of three girls—Rachael, Lucy, and Elisabeth. He serves as Pastor of Families at Sojourn Community Church–Midtown in Louisville, KY and as children’s ministry strategist for Sojourn Network. He blogs regularly at gospelcenteredfamily.com.

New Growth Press publishes gospel-centered Christian books, small group, and kids Bible resources for discipleship, biblical counseling, and missional ministry. For more information about The Beginner’s Gospel Story Bible and other releases from New Growth Press, visit www.newgrowthpress.com.    

Tuesday, November 28, 2017

Christmas at Grey Sage


The holiday season is the perfect time to settle in for a cozy night of reading! Phyllis Clark Nichols’ Christmas at Grey Sage takes place in the snow-covered Sangre de Cristo Mountains near Santa Fe at the Grey Sage Inn. The sprawling inn becomes close quarters as stranded guests discover this Christmas won’t be the relaxed vacation they expected because of an usual snowstorm. Tension and fear mount as the storm worsens, and Silas, a retired doctor, is called away in the middle of the night to care for a neighbor. The snow and stress unlocks tongues–and in the unexpected conversation that follows, secrets and pasts are revealed, and hearts are healed. In the midst of snowdrifts and fireside conversations, of tales of days gone by, the warmth of Christmas brings a renewed hope as these trapped strangers become friends—proof again that the joy, hope, peace, and love of Christmas can be experienced no matter where you are.

{MORE ABOUT CHRISTMAS AT GREY SAGE}


(Gilead Publishing, October 2017)
This Christmas, there’s plenty of room at the inn.
Nestled in the snow-covered Sangre de Cristo Mountains near Santa Fe, the Grey Sage Inn looks like the perfect place for weary travelers to escape the craziness of the Christmas season. There’s plenty to see in historic Santa Fe during the day, and the inn’s owners, Maude and Silas Thornhill, are happy to spend their evenings hosting this year’s guests from across the country.
But an unusual snowstorm throws a wrench in the festive mood. The sprawling inn becomes close quarters as stranded guests discover this Christmas won’t be the relaxed vacation they expected. Tension and fear mount as the storm worsens, and Silas, a retired doctor, is called away in the middle of the night to care for a neighbor. The snow and stress unlocks tongues–and in the unexpected conversation that follows, secrets and pasts are revealed, and hearts are healed.
In the midst of snowdrifts and fireside conversations, of tales of days gone by, the warmth of Christmas brings a renewed hope as these trapped strangers become friends–proof again that the joy, hope, peace, and love of Christmas can be experienced no matter where you are.

Phyllis Clark Nichols

{MORE ABOUT PHYLLIS CLARK NICHOLS}


Phyllis Clark Nichols believes everyone could use a little more hope and light. Her character-driven Southern fiction explores profound human questions from within the simple lives of small town communities you just know you’ve visited before. With a love for nature, art, faith and ordinary people, she tells redemptive tales of loss and recovery, estrangement and connection, longing and fulfillment, often through surprisingly serendipitous events. 
Phyllis grew up in the deep shade of magnolia trees in South Georgia. Now she lives in the Texas Hill Country with her portrait-artist husband, where red birds and axis deer are her ever-ravenous neighbors. She is an English major and classically-trained musician, seminary graduate, concert artist and co-founder of a national cable network for the health and disability-related programming. After retiring as a cable network executive, Phyllis began leading mission teams to orphanages in Guatemala and now serves on three non-profit boards where she works with others who are equally passionate about bringing hope and light to those who need it most.
Find out more about Phyllis at http://www.phyllisclarknichols.com.

Monday, November 27, 2017

Love is... a project every night of the week.

My whole life is work and craft projects. That's it. Keeps me out of trouble and productive, I suppose.

I've been making sports balls for days on end, but last week I did the writing for these signs for a wedding. They turned out great. If you know anyone who needs something like this, I'll take orders and do requests during the off season which starts January 1. Actually, let's make it February 1 because I plan to hibernate in January.

Sunday, November 26, 2017

The Twelve Sons of Jacob

I didn't get my videos recorded right this month to have one of my current kids this week. I've been off whack in about every area of life this month. So, it's time for a flashback. These kids have grown so much in the past two years!



The Twelve Sons of Jacob

Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah
Dan, Naphtali, Gad and Asher. 
Issachar, Zebulun, Joseph and Benjamin,
These are the sons of Jacob.



Saturday, November 25, 2017

Still no signs of Christmas

Still no signs of Christmas around here. At least not outside of the craft room where there could be signs of Christmas May - December. That doesn't count. That's just the norm.

Here's what I did instead of decorating my Christmas tree today.



I have a couple more soccer balls done without the writing finished. Soccer balls and volleyballs take the longest to plot out and do. I hate doing soccer balls. I get out my protractor and everything.

I'm hoping the basketballs, softballs, baseballs and hockey puck go a lot faster. 

Friday, November 24, 2017

One of the big reasons why I may not put up my Christmas tree this year

There is more than one reason why I may not get my Christmas tree up this year. Mainly...


The Crafty Dad and Daughter still has three events over the next two weekends. Two events are next weekend, and I have to split stock. One of the events is supposed to be the largest (or one of the largest) in the DFW area. I'm trying to make enough stuff to be covered for the last three.

Here's what I did today instead of putting up a Christmas tree:




Thursday, November 23, 2017

Am I the only one without food pictures?

Happy Thanksgiving!

As is the norm, a day and a half went into cooking a meal eaten in about 30 minutes. I'd like to add that I'm a pretty good cook for only cooking once a year.

Ok, so that's not exactly true, but possibly close. I have no photos to document it either.

I should have taken a picture of my chocolate pecan pie like my brother did the coconut pie he and his wife made. Or maybe she made it. Not really sure, but they were bragging on their pies earlier in the week when we went out for chili the other night.

Anyway, I found a recipe one time for an Eagle Brand Milk pecan pie. I wanted to fix it, but the only can of Eagle Brand Milk mom had was chocolate (and past its best by date to be honest). We decided to put it in instead and see how it turned out.

It turned out awesome.

Now, we'll not be able to recreate it because the chocolate was a limited edition and is not currently available. I just looked it up on their website. Nope. Not there. They do have caramel which would probably be pretty good.

If you are interested in the recipe, leave a comment. I'm not finding it right away online to share it, and don't remember it right off the top of my head. I'd dig deeper, but won't waste the time if no one actually wants it. ;)

Wednesday, November 22, 2017

The Gift of Christmas Past

After nearly a decade of being apart, tragedy brings together Hadley and Monroe. Take a break from the holiday busyness and settle in for a story of young love lost and second chances in Cindy Woodsmall and Erin Woodsmall’s The Gift of Christmas Past. Years of secrets and anger beg to be set free as Hadley and Monroe try to push aside past hurts and find common ground in order to help the traumatized child and her family. Can the love of Christmas past drift into the present, bringing healing and hope for all?

{MORE ABOUT THE GIFT OF CHRISTMAS PAST}


(Woodsmall Press, October 2017)
Arson wasn’t the only fire that ignited between them.
Promises shattered.
Lies spoken.
She was arrested.
He returned to the safety of his wealthy parents.
Almost ten years later, Hadley and Monroe are both specialists in the field of speech therapy. They meet again . . . thrown together to help a four-year-old-girl rendered mute after being rescued from a fire.
Years of secrets and anger beg to be set free as Hadley and Monroe try to push aside past hurts and find common ground in order to help the traumatized child and her family.
Can the love of Christmas past drift into the present, bringing healing and hope for all?
Cindy and Erin Woodsmall

{MORE ABOUT CINDY AND ERIN WOODSMALL}


Cindy Woodsmall is the New York Times and CBA best-selling author of eighteen works of fiction. She’s been featured in national media outlets such as ABC’s Nightline and the Wall Street Journal. Cindy has won numerous awards and has been finalist for the prestigious Christy, Rita, and Carol Awards. Cindy and her husband reside near the foothills of the North Georgia Mountains in Flowery Branch, GA. 
Erin Woodsmall is a writer, musician, wife, and mom of three. She has edited, brainstormed, and researched books with Cindy for almost a decade. She is very excited about their first coauthored book.
Find out more about Cindy and Erin at http://www.cindywoodsmall.com.

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Ritual, Relationships and Rest


Part 1 of an interview with Melissa Spoelstra,
Author of Total Christmas Makeover
  
As Melissa Spoelstra studied the Book of Numbers while writing her Bible study on the topic, she noticed three elements included in the festivities and began thinking about how she could apply them to her personal Christmas celebrations. She shares those revelations with readers in her latest book, Total Christmas Makeover (Abingdon Press). In fact, Spoelstra devotes a section of the book to each of the elements:

Ritual: Special activities out of the ordinary routine were planned to help remember what God has done.
Relationships: Time spent together preparing special foods, eating, gathering in holy assembly, and explaining traditions to children.
Rest: Regular work set aside for planned times of celebration and rest from activity to allow for reflection on God.

“A total Christmas makeover doesn’t mean scrapping all your holiday traditions or adding ten more to your list. Instead, it is a personal time of reflection to evaluate how your Christmas practices align with some biblical concepts of celebration,” explains Spoelstra. “Passover, festivals, and feasts were instituted by God to help His people remember who He is and what He has done. While we have no such specifics given for our celebration of Christ’s birth because it comes from church history rather than biblical mandate, we can glean some important principles about celebration from Scripture.”

Q: Since the Bible doesn’t expressly instruct us to celebrate Christ’s birth, is it OK to mix the more secular elements of Christmas in with the religious aspects of the holiday?

In light of the many holy days set aside in Scripture for the purpose of celebration, I have to believe God loves a good party. Jesus spent a significant time at parties during His ministry on earth. I don’t think every aspect of Christmas has to be hyper-spiritual. Of course, we want to focus on Christ’s humble birth, God’s extravagant love and the sacrifice He made to redeem us. That doesn’t mean we can’t have some rituals that are just for fun. My husband hides our children’s stockings every year since we never had a good place to hang them. They wake up before us on Christmas morning and find a handwritten poem with clues and parameters to start hunting. As they got older he went a little crazy, burying one in a bin underground and another year placing one of them on the roof (clearly without permission from me!). This has no spiritual significance, but it will be one of my children’s favorite memories. Later in the day we will read from Luke and share what Christ has done in our lives, but the morning stocking hunt is just for fun. I’m sure many of you have traditions that aren’t inherently spiritual, but if they aren’t contrary to God’s Word or offensive to Christ’s message, I believe we have a lot of freedom in Christ worth exercising!

Q: As long as you make sure everything you do is Christ-honoring in some way, is there anything wrong with going “all out” for Christmas? Looking at the opposite end of the spectrum, is it OK if you don’t do anything special to observe or celebrate Christmas?

Let’s remember that Christmas isn’t a commanded holy day in the Bible. God did issue consequences for those who refused to celebrate Passover without a good reason (Numbers 9:13), but Christmas is a tradition, not a commanded holiday. I have friends who really go all out. My friend Elizabeth loves Christmas. She has the gift of wonder, and her excitement is contagious. God loves extravagantly. He went all out with an angel song for shepherds. There is nothing wrong with going all out. The danger comes when we lose our focus on Christ and exhaust ourselves with an overwhelmed attitude. Those who choose not to celebrate Christmas citing the commercialization, pagan roots of some traditions or personal reasons aren’t breaking any biblical command either. Most of us fall somewhere in the middle of these two extremes. What we need is balance and Holy Spirit leading to manage our time, talents and treasures in a way that honors the God we celebrate at Christmas.


Q: What are some of your family’s favorite traditions? How have they changed throughout the years?

When our children were little, someone shared with me the Jesse Tree project. It includes 25 short devotions with references to pages in the Beginner Bible. The stories begin with creation and end with the cross. The booklet also gave instructions for corresponding ornaments to place on a miniature Christmas tree. We made or bought these ornaments and wrapped them with Christmas paper. Our children enjoyed making many of them since we couldn’t find a fiery furnace or Ten Commandments scroll in stores! We used shrinky dinks, construction paper, pipe cleaners and a variety of craft materials. Each year I would wrap them all individually and put the corresponding number of the day it was to be placed on the tree on the package. Each night before bed we would do the reading, and the kids would take turns opening the ornament and hanging it on a small tree.

Once our children got into middle school, our bedtime routines changed with sports and youth group activities, and we found ourselves needing to catch up doing two or three ornaments every few days. Eventually we stopped doing the Jesse Tree devotions and ornaments and assigned each child an evening to share their own devotion on a Christmas topic of their choosing (star, angels, wise man, shepherds, etc.). They had to include a fun activity (game or craft) as well as a reading from Scripture and discussion questions. While I love to reminiscence our sweet nightly December times when they were little with the Jesse Tree, I also enjoy our new traditions with college- and high-school-aged kids.

Q: During the busyness of the holiday season, in what ways can we focus on relationships and valuing others?

If we aren’t careful, people can become scenery and machinery. The waitress who brings our coffee. The postal worker who brings the mail. These are real people with real stories. When we break through the reverie of our own to-do lists and start to see them, we can ask questions. We can begin to pray for them. We might even get the opportunity to share about Christ with words or show them Christ with generosity. We want to become “there you are” kind of people rather than “here I am” Christians. This will require us to be intentional in focusing on people rather than tasks during a busy time of year.

Q: The third section of Total Christmas Makeover focuses on rest. How are we supposed to work rest into December? Isn’t rest what January is for?

Rest requires preparation. It means we must leave some margin in our schedules and finances. We must block off chunks of time and guard them as an important commitment. Biblical celebration always required Sabbath. No regular work was to be done. This has never been as challenging as it is now with email on our phone and notifications galore. To take a true break from ordinary work, it might mean locking up devices or just checking them a little less frequently. Rest isn’t watching more television. It means giving our minds, bodies and souls a chance to stop and leave space to hear from God. True rest produces no work, but it does leave us refreshed and reflective.

Q: In what ways can rest mean different things for different people?

Introverts and extroverts often find different types of things restful. As an introvert, I like to rest alone. I enjoy reading, napping, sitting outside or going for a stroll. My extroverted husband still likes a good nap and some of these activities as well, but he feels rested talking with friends or family. He enjoys a family game or a walk with others. Being with people replenishes him while being alone recharges me. Each person must discover the type of things that help them feel rested and connected to God. At Christmas, I enjoy sitting on my couch each evening just looking at the lights on my Christmas tree. I think about my day and my God and take a few minutes to savor what Jesus has done in my life.



Monday, November 20, 2017

Celebrate the 50th anniversary of a classic American novel


Part 1 of an interview with Nancy LeSourd,
Publisher of Gilead Publishing’s Evergreen Farm imprint
about Catherine Marshall’s Christy


Some stories are evergreen, their themes and lessons standing the test of time and connecting with readers generation after generation. One such book is Catherine Marshall’s Christy, originally released in 1967 and now celebrating its 50th anniversary with the release of a new hardcover edition and its first-ever release as an e-book from Evergreen Farm, an imprint of Gilead Publishing. Based on Marshall’s mother’s life, the story of Christy is one of determination, devotion and commitment to making a difference in the world.

Marshall’s best seller tells the story of nineteen-year-old teacher Christy Huddleston who moves from her home in Asheville, North Carolina, in 1912 and finds herself in Cutter Gap, a Smoky Mountain community that feels suspended in time, trapped by poverty, superstitions and century-old traditions. Christy struggles to find acceptance in her new home, and some of the Cutter Gap residents see her — and her one-room school — as a threat to their way of life. Her faith is challenged by trial and tragedy, and her heart is torn between two strong men with conflicting views about how to care for the families of the Cove.

Q: How many copies of Christy have been sold in the last 50 years since its original release? 

Exact figures are hard to estimate as the way sales are tracked has changed throughout the years. The book has also been re-released in various formats from different publishers. However, with the information we do have, we believe more than 10 million copies have been sold.


Q: Readers throughout time have always had a strong emotional connection to Christy. What is it about Christy that resonates with young women especially?

The story of Christy has endured because of its timeless themes. A young person, barely 19, is inspired to contribute her time and talents to make a difference. Her idealistic ideas clash head-on with those who see her as an outsider, a do-gooder and a meddler. Christy has to learn how to come alongside people she wants to “help” and learn how to care — really care — for them, one person at a time.

Throughout the years, we have learned of many people inspired by the story of Christy who became a teacher or a doctor or who entered public service living among the poor in their communities in the United States or abroad.

Q: In what ways will millennials be able to relate to Christy, a character based on a woman who was born 120 years ago?

There is an entire generation who does not remember the CBS TV series. I gathered our children to watch it every week, but they were two and four when it aired. Today they are 25 and 27. The largest demographic by 2020 will be the millennials. Their choices, passions, investments of time, talent and treasure will impact America economically, politically and socially.

I am particularly excited to introduce this audience to the novel Christy. Christy is a timeless tale of courage, determination and passion — a story very much reflective of millennials today. With their desire to make a difference, ingenuity to create businesses or engage in work that has social impact and rejection of cash donations in favor of offering their time and talents or social enterprise, it is time to introduce them to this amazing young woman, Christy. Christy and other key characters in the novel, such as the doctor and a minister, have to learn how to take who they are and what they have to give and learn to serve a community that challenges them in ways they cannot anticipate.

How these key characters approach trying to make a difference — all very unique and different — are everyman and everywoman who desires to do the same in their own community today. The wonderful thing about millennials is that they are disrupters; they want to make a difference. The desire to be a change agent often starts in the heart, as did Christy’s desire to come to the mountains to teach children. That inspirational motivation can sometimes flag when met with obstacles, resistance or even hatred. The story of Christy takes on these challenges head-on and does not flinch with depicting the realities of pitting the enthusiastic change agent Christy against resistant, suspicious people in the community. How she navigates her life in the Cove and her passion to make a difference applies to anyone who wants to make a difference in his or her community, business, charity or social enterprise.


Q: What lessons can those who are about to make a life change and enter an unfamiliar world glean from the story of Christy?

In a word, courage. It took a lot of courage for Christy Huddleston to leave everything familiar and comfortable and enter a world different from anything she had experienced before. Her life in the Appalachian Tennessee mountains was a stark contrast to the life she had lived in the city of Asheville, North Carolina. It required courage for her to face opposition and evil. It required courage for her to face her own shortcomings and doubts without running away. She continued to try new methods and ideas.

Perseverance is another lesson. Christy learned that change of social injustice and community values is slow and often painful. Changing a community and its way of doing things is usually the result of impacting one life at a time. Learning how to persevere in the midst of discouragement and setbacks is another life lesson demonstrated in Christy’s encounters with the fiercely determined Scottish highlanders in the mountains of Tennessee.

Unexpected joy — it is often when we risk the familiar, launch out into the uncertain future and leave behind what is comfortable and familiar that we encounter unexpected joy. Christy had no idea when she first arrived in the Cove that she would experience unfettered joy with these ragamuffin children, encounter the depths of shared friendship and insights with an unusual mentor or be taught about true beauty and joy in the simplest of things by a mountain woman. She came as the teacher. She came to serve. She came to make a difference. As so often happens when we take these kinds of risks, she found herself the recipient of so much more.


Sunday, November 19, 2017

I'm all Wrapped Up, Tied Up, Tangled Up in Jesus


Wrapped Up, Tied Up, Tangled Up

I’m all wrapped up,
I’m all tied up,
I’m all tangled up in Jesus.
I’m all wrapped up,
I’m all tied up,
I’m all tangled up in God.

I’m all wrapped up,
All tied up,
All tangled up in Jesus.
I’m all wrapped up,
tied up, tangled up in God.

Repeat, faster each time

Saturday, November 18, 2017

Just a typical Saturday in the fall

Through texts and online messages, I've had people ask how my birthday was. Well, it was a typical fall Saturday for me. The Crafty Dad and Daughter on the road again, this time in Sachse!

This was our 7th event in 8 weeks. We're off this coming weekend, then have three more over the next two weekends to have 10 in 10 weeks. At least it's been a really good fall for us. I'm ready to sleep in January!





Friday, November 17, 2017

Rachel Dylan's Deadly Proof

After a whistleblower in the pharmaceutical cover-up case dies, attorney Kate Sullivan knows the stakes are much higher than her other lawsuits. Get ready to stay up way past your bedtime turning the pages to find out what happens next in Rachel Dylan’s new legal thriller, Deadly Proof. Trying to forget the past, former Army Ranger turned private investigator Landon James is hired by Kate to look into the whistleblower’s allegation. He also soon finds himself falling for the passionate and earnest young lawyer. As the case deepens, it appears someone is willing to risk everything—even murder—to keep the case from going to trial.
Enter to win a copy of Deadly Proof. Five winners will be chosen! Click the image below to enter to win. The winners will be announced December 7 on the Litfuse blog!


{MORE ABOUT DEADLY PROOF}
(Bethany House, September 2017)
Riveting new series offers legal suspense with a romantic twist
In the biggest case of her career, attorney Kate Sullivan is tapped as lead counsel to take on Mason Pharmaceutical because of a corporate cover-up related to its newest drug. After a whistleblower dies, Kate knows the stakes are much higher than her other lawsuits.
Former Army Ranger turned private investigator Landon James is still haunted by mistakes made while serving overseas. Trying to forget the past, he is hired by Kate to look into the whistleblower’s allegation and soon suspects that the company may be engaging in a dangerous game for profit. He also soon finds himself falling for this passionate and earnest young lawyer.
Determined not to make the same mistakes, he’s intent on keeping Kate safe, but as the case deepens, it appears someone is willing to risk everything—even murder—to keep the case from going to trial.
Rachel Dylan

{MORE ABOUT RACHEL DYLAN}


Rachel Dylan writes Christian fiction including legal romantic suspense. Rachel has practiced law for over a decade and enjoys weaving together legal and suspenseful stories. In addition, Rachel writes the Danger in the Deep South including Lethal Action and Devoted Defender, which appeals to fans of edge of your seat romantic suspense. Rachel also writes the Windy Ridge series including Trial & Tribulations and Fatal Accusation. These legal thrillers with elements of spiritual warfare are great for fans who enjoy books by Peretti or Dekker. Trial & Tribulations was a Selah finalist in 2016. Rachel lives in Michigan with her husband and five furkids—two dogs and three cats. Rachel loves to connect with readers.
Find out more about Rachel at http://www.racheldylan.com.